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NERC_DDC

1608 record(s)
 
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    The dataset consists of data for the UK for the Sustainable Development Goal 6.6.1: groundwater sub-indicator for the period 1990 to 2019. The dataset reports for the UK against Sub-Indicator 5 of Goal 6.6.1, following the recommended procedures in the UNEP report on monitoring methodologies for that sub-indicator. The sub-indicator is defined as the change in mean groundwater levels, averaged over a five-year period, from a mean in levels over a previous five-year reference period. Groundwater level data was obtained from BGS’ WellMaster database. 192 groundwater level monitoring stations were processed and, following quality control, 154 were used to provide estimates of regional variation in groundwater levels for 19 of the 34 HydroBASINS at Level 6 in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. As required by the guidance in the monitoring methodology, the sites chosen are representative of local and regional groundwater systems and are observation and monitoring boreholes where groundwater levels are not systematically affected by abstraction. All sites chosen have average monitoring frequencies of greater than one observation a month. The dataset is provided as a .csv file with the following headers: Column A: HYBAS_ID, HydroBASIN unique identification number. Column B: reference period (1990 to 1994). Columns C to AA: reporting periods (five-year periods starting in 1991) with data reported as percentage change (relative to reference period) in running mean five-year groundwater level by HydroBasin.

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    The 5km Hex GS Landslides dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Landslides v8 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of slope instability. Landslide hazard occurs due to particular slope characteristics (such as geology, gradient, sources of water, drainage, man-made constructions) combining to cause the slope to become unstable. Downslope movement of materials, such as a landslide or rockfall may lead to a loss of support and damage to buildings. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

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    GeoSure Basic is a single, combined GeoSure model, based on the 6 geohazard layers produced for the GeoSure dataset package. The methodology behind GeoSure Basic uses only the highest score of all the GeoSure layers, which cover: Collapsible Deposits, Compessible Ground, Landslides, Running Sand, Shrink Swell, and Dissolution. The resulting model has been re-classified to show 'Negligible - Very Low', 'Low', and 'Moderate - High' potential for natural geohazards. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

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    The World Magnetic Model (WMM), produced jointly with the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center, is the standard model in UK Ministry of Defence and US Department of Defense navigation and attitude reference systems and is also used widely in civilian navigation systems. The model is also used on marine and aviation charts and is revised every five years.

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    The IGRF is a global model of the geomagnetic field. It allows spot values of the geomagnetic field vector to be calculated anywhere from the Earth's core out into space. The IGRF is generally revised every five years by a group of modellers associated with the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA).

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    The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents a simplified version of the Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland, with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland is published in Z Daraktchieva, J D Appleton, D M Rees, K A M Adlam, A H Myers, S A Hodgson, N P McColl, G R Wasson and L J Peake, 2015. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland. PHE-CRCE-017, 22 pp. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the radon Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration exceeding the Action Level.

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    Offprints of articles relating to Geomagnetism from 1822 to 1981. Offprints collected by Kew Observatory, Meteorological Office, Edinburgh and Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux castle). The first page of each offprint has been digitised to produce a finding aid.

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    Digital images of petrology rock thin sections from samples that are referenced in the BGS Petrological Collection Database (Britrocks). Two reference images are being captured for each thin section, one taken in Plane Polarized Light (PPL) and the other in Crossed Polarized Light (XPL). The Britrocks database provides an index to the BGS mineralogical & petrological collection. The computer database covers samples in the UK onshore mapping collection together with worldwide reference minerals and the Museum Reserve collection. The first England and Wales collection sample is from circa 1877, Threshthwaite Comb, Cumbria (collected by the Reverend Clifton Ward). The addition of new samples, transfer of records from registers and updates of existing records is ongoing on a regular basis. Internet access to the database is provided on the BGS web site. Capture of the Scottish Collections began February 2012. Capture of the English and foreign collections began in December 2012.

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    Joint BGS/Environment Agency dataset of aquifer designations for England and Wales at 1:50 000. The dataset identifies different types of aquifer - underground layers of water-bearing permeable rock or drift deposits from which groundwater can be extracted. These designations reflect the importance of aquifers in terms of groundwater as a resource (drinking water supply) but also their role in supporting surface water flows and wetland ecosystems. The maps are split into two different type of aquifer designation: superficial - permeable unconsolidated (loose) deposits (for example, sands and gravels), and bedrock - solid permeable formations e.g. sandstone, chalk and limestone.

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    The map shows the localities where samples that form part of the BGS rock collections have been taken. Many of these samples are from surface exposure, and were collected by BGS geologists during the course of geological mapping programmes. Others are from onshore boreholes or from mine and quarry workings. The principal collections are the E (England and Wales), S (Scotland), N (continuation of the S collection) and the MR (miscellaneous). The collections, which are held at the BGS offices at Keyworth (Nottingham) and Edinburgh, comprise both hand specimens and thin sections, although in individual samples either may not be immediately available. Users may also note that the BGS holds major collections of borehole cores and hand specimens as well as over a million palaeontological samples. The Britrocks database provides an index to these collections. With over 120,000 records, it now holds data for some 70% of the entire collections, including the UK samples shown in this application as well as rocks from overseas locations and reference minerals. The collections are continuously being added to and sample records from archived registers are also being copied into the electronic database. Map coverage is thin in some areas where copying from original paper registers has not been completed. Further information on Britrocks samples in these and other areas can be obtained from the Chief Curator at the BGS Keyworth (Nottingham) office or from the rock curator at the BGS Murchison House (Edinburgh) office.