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    Information for this layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) is taken from the BGS National Landslide Database (NLD), which holds over 15000 records of landslides and is the definitive source of landslide information for Great Britain (excludes Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands). Each landslide within the National Landslide Database is identified by a National Landslide Database ID number and a point location, as shown on this map. The National Landslide Database ID number represents an individual survey of a landslide, rather than just the landslide itself. This is because there could be several phases of movement within or extensions to the same landslide, particularly if it is a large and complex one. Subsequent surveys of the same landslide may be recorded in the database with the same National Landslide Database ID number but with a new Survey Number. Other information given for each record include; Landslide name, grid reference and whether the landslide record has been validated by the BGS Landslides Team. The point symbols at the designated location do not reflect the size and shape of the corresponding landslide, but just denote the recorded presence of a landslide within a range of accuracy.

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    In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2012 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads. It complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The 121 component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 20,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them, they also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram was built in 2009-12 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme and the Environment Agency of England and Wales. 14 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

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    1. Grids (in spreadsheet form) of interpreted parameters from the 3D time-lapse seismics (temporal and constructed depth thicknesses) at the Sleipner CO2 storage operation in the North Sea. 2. A synthetic seismic model of a CO2 wedge, to examine the relationship between wedge true thickness and temporal thicknesses. These datasets underpin following publications: Chadwick, R.A., Williams, G.A. & White, J.C. 2016. High resolution imaging and characterisation of a CO2 layer at the Sleipner CO2 Storage operation using time-lapse seismics. First Break, 34, 79-87. The source data comprise the Sleipner 3D time-lapse surveys which were acquired in 1994 (baseline), 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010. The dataset used here for measuring temporal thicknesses is the 2010 high resolution dataset with constructed depth thicknesses from the 1994 baseline data. Grant number: EP/K035878/1.

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    EPSRC project EP/K035878/1 - The DiSECCS seismic analysis toolbox comprises a series of codes which implement various algorithms for analysing post-stack seismic data acquired as part of a geological carbon sequestration monitoring programme. The tools focus on determining the thickness, saturation distribution and physical properties of CO2 layers imaged on seismic data. The toolbox also contains a number of new rock physics models developed as part of the DiSECCS project in the form of Mathematica notebooks.

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    The spreadsheet gathers the data collected during an experiment conducted on a Utsira Sand formation core sample to complements and constrains existing geophysical monitoring surveys at Sleipner and, more generally, improves the understanding of shallow weakly-cemented sand reservoirs. The tests were conducted in the rock physics laboratory at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, during 2016, as part of the DiSECCS project with funding from the United Kingdom’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC grant EP/K035878/1) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The experiment was a steady state brine-CO2 flow-through test to simultaneously evaluate ultrasonic waves, electrical resistivity (converted into pore fluid distribution) and mechanical indicators during CO2 geosequestration in shallow weakly-cemented reservoirs. The confining and pore pressure conditions were similar to those estimated for Sleipner (North Sea – like storage reservoirs), but simulating inflation/depletion cyclic scenarios for increasing brine:CO2 fractional flow rates. The data include primary ultrasonic wave velocities and attenuation factors, axial and radial strains, and electrical resistivity. Also, we provide a velocity-saturation relationship of practical importance to CO2 plume monitoring, obtained from the inversion of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation data and extrapolation of results to field-scale seismic-frequencies using a new rock physics theory. The dataset is linked to this publication: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1750583617306370.

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    Report summarising the contents of the seismic analysis toolbox produced during the DiSECCS project. The toolbox comprises an online library of seismic software developed and utilised in the project, and presented in a form that other practitioners can utilise and tailor to their own specific needs. The toolbox include software for the measurement and characterisation of thin CO2 layers by spectral and attenuation analysis, fracture characterisation via wavelet coda analysis, novel rock physics algorithms and a summary of new laboratory analyses.

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    EPSRC project EP/K035878/1 - DiSECCS research has focussed on developing advanced seismic monitoring tools and combining these with social science research to identify key factors in establishing trust and confidence in the storage system.This report presents insights into and recommendations for the monitoring systems and protocols required to maintain the integrity of storage reservoirs suitable for large-scale CO2 storage and for obtaining a social licence to operate a CCS project.

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    EPSRC project EP/K035878/1 - Report summarising scientific findings from Work Packages 1 to 4 of the DiSECCS project. These include advanced seismic methods for assessing pressure changes and fluid flow processes in a reservoir rock, experimental rock physics and public perceptions for CCS and analogue activities.

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    The spreadsheet gathers the data collected during a brine:CO2 flow-through experiment conducted on a weakly-cemented synthetic sandstone core sample using the multiflow experimental rig for CO2 experiments, designed and assembled at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. The test was configured to assess geophysical monitoring and deformation of reservoirs subjected to CO2 injection in shallow weakly-cemented (North Sea-like, e.g., Sleipner) CO2 storage sandstone reservoirs. The tests was conducted in the rock physics laboratory at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, during 2015-2016, as part of the DiSECCS project with funding from the United Kingdom’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC grant EP/K035878/1) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The experiment was a steady state brine-CO2 flow-through test in which realistic shallow CO2 geosequestration conditions were simulated, to related geophysical signatures to the hydrodynamic and geomechanical behaviour of the rock sample. The confining and pore pressure conditions were similar to those estimated for shallow North Sea Sleipner-like, storage reservoirs, but simulating inflation/depletion cyclic scenarios for increasing brine:CO2 fractional flow rates. The data include ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities and their respective attenuation factors, axial, radial and volumetric strains, and electrical resistivity; also relative permeability to both fluids (CO2 and brine) is displayed as a function of pore volume times, associated to increasing CO2 to brine contents in the sample.

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    EPSRC grant EP/L012227/1: Development of Unified Experimental and Theoretical Approach to Predict Reactive Transport in Subsurface Porous Media. The effect of pore-scale heterogeneity on non-Darcy flow behaviour is investigated by means of direct flow simulations on 3-D images of Estaillades carbonate. The critical Reynolds number indicating the cessation of the creeping Darcy flow regime in Estaillades carbonate is two orders of magnitude smaller than in Bentheimer sandstone, and is three orders of magnitude smaller than in the beadpack. It is inferred from the examination of flow field features that the emergence of steady eddies in pore space of Estaillades at elevated fluid velocities accounts for the early transition away from the Darcy flow regime. Also available at https://www.digitalrocksportal.org/projects/10, DOI:10.17612/P73W2C. Further details can be found in Muljadi et al., Advances in Water Resources (2015), URL:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2015.05.019.