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2022

44 record(s)
 
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    A dataset of trace metal concentrations (As, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in indoor dust from homes from 11 countries, along with a suite of potentially contributory residential characteristics. A household vacuum dust sample, collected by the study participant using their regular vacuum cleaner, was submitted to the laboratory for analysis by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) on the <250um sieved fraction, along with the completion of an online questionnaire survey. Dust sample collection took place between 2018 – 2021. The Home Biome project is affiliated to the DustSafe community science programme (see mapmyenvironment.com). Sample location data are provided at town/city and Country level. Health risk from exposure to potentially contaminant-laden dust has been widely reported. Given the amount of time people spend indoors, residential environments are an important but understudied environment with respect to human exposure to contaminants. Indeed, the nature of the hazard that house dust presents remains poorly characterized. These data will be of interest to those interested in human exposure to potentially toxic elements and environmental health, as well as to the participants, who received a bespoke report on their sample data and information on key sources and ways to reduce exposure to trace elements in indoor dust.

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    The <250um fraction of 19 household vacuum dust samples (collected by citizen participants during 2019-2021) were extracted using high throughput isolation of microbial genomic DNA and sequenced using Illumina NextSeq (12 samples from a national campaign within the UK, 7 samples from Greece and a negative reagent control included to ensure sterility throughout the processing and sequencing steps). These data are available (following period of embargo) from the European Nucleotide Archive via the individual sample accession numbers ERS9609044 to ERS9609063, submitted under the study ID PRJEB49546. Sample location data are provided at town/city, country level. Given the amount of time people spend indoors, residential environments are perhaps the most important, but understudied environments with respect to human exposure to microbes and other contaminants. Across our urban environments, anthropogenic activities (both current and legacy) provide for multiple sources and pathways for the generation and distribution of microbes, inorganic and organic contaminants within the home environment, yet we know relatively little about the potential for dissemination of antibiotic resistance in microbial communities within indoor dust.

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    We present new age models for the Ediacaran-Cambrian which lacks a robust global temporal framework. This interval marks the radiation of animals, but there are major uncertainties in the evolutionary dynamics of this critical radiation and its relationship to changes in palaeoenvironmental changes. Here we present global data from 130 successions that enable us to create four new possible global age models (A to D) for the interval 551–517 million years ago (Ma). These models comprise composite carbonate carbon isotope (δ13Ccarb) curves, which are anchored to radiometric ages and consistent with strontium isotope chemostratigraphy, and are used to calibrate metazoan distribution in space and time. These models differ most prominently in the temporal position of the basal Cambrian negative δ13Ccarb excursion (BACE). Two age models (A and B) place the BACE within the Ediacaran, and yield an age of ~538.8 Ma for the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary; however models C and D appear to be the most parsimonious and may support a recalibration of the boundary age by up to 3 Myr younger. All age models reveal a previously underappreciated degree of variability in the terminal Ediacaran, incorporating notable positive and negative excursions that precede the BACE. Nothwithstanding remaining uncertainties in chemostratigraphic correlation, all models support a pre-BACE first appearance of Cambrian-type shelly fossils in Siberia and possibly South China, and show that the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition was a protracted interval represented by a series of successive radiations. Data were compiled by Fred Bowyer, with support from Andrey Yu. Zhuravlev, Rachel Wood, Maoyan Zhu, Graham Shields, Ying Zhou, Chuang Yang, Simon Poulton, Dan Condon, Andrew Curtis.

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    Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the remote site (TOPR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the underline site (TOPU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert, J., Beggan, C. D., Richardson, G. S., Martyn, T., & Thomson, A. W. P. (2020). Differential magnetometer measurements of geomagnetically induced currents in a complex high voltage network. Space Weather, 18, e2019SW002421. doi: 10.1029/2019SW002421 for further details.

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    HystLab (Hysteresis Loop analysis box), is MATLAB based software for the advanced processing and analysis of magnetic hysteresis data. Hysteresis loops are one of the most ubiquitous rock magnetic measurements and with the growing need for high resolution analyses of ever larger datasets, there is a need to rapidly, consistently, and accurately process and analyze these data. HystLab is an easy to use graphical interface that is compatible with a wide range of software platforms. The software can read a wide range of data formats and rapidly process the data. It includes functionality to re-center loops, correction for drift, and perform a range of slope saturation corrections.

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    The palaeointensity (PINT) database of estimates of absolute palaeomagnetic field strength throughout Earth history. The aim of the PINT database is to catalogue all absolute palaeointensity data with ages > 50 ka which have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. The data is provided at the cooling unit level or, in the case of large intrusions, at the sampling site level. In some cases, the data provided in the publication only allows averages of multiple cooling units to be given. In such cases, this should be a Field. The database was published in Bono et al. (2021, https://doi.org/10.1093/gji/ggab490) and an online version is available at http://pintdb.org/

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    Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the remote site (DALR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the underline site (DALU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert, J., Beggan, C. D., Richardson, G. S., Martyn, T., & Thomson, A. W. P. (2020). Differential magnetometer measurements of geomagnetically induced currents in a complex high voltage network. Space Weather, 18, e2019SW002421. doi: 10.1029/2019SW002421 for further details.

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    Long period magnetotelluric (LMT) time series for site Whiteadder (WHI). Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the three cartesian components of the Earth’s natural magnetic field and the natural horizontal electric field at the site. The database will include .xyz files with the LMT data and one document with metadata. See Hübert, J., Beggan, C. D., Richardson, G. S., Martyn, T., & Thomson, A. W. P. (2020). Differential magnetometer measurements of geomagnetically induced currents in a complex high voltage network. Space Weather, 18, e2019SW002421. doi: 10.1029/2019SW002421 for further details.

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    Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 “Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)”. These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field and the field created by GIC at the underline site (BUDU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert, J., Beggan, C. D., Richardson, G. S., Martyn, T., & Thomson, A. W. P. (2020). Differential magnetometer measurements of geomagnetically induced currents in a complex high voltage network. Space Weather, 18, e2019SW002421. doi: 10.1029/2019SW002421 for further details.

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    The code base for IsoplotR’s graphical user interface (GUI) and its core data processing algorithms are surgically separated from each other. The command-line functionality is grouped in a lightweight package called IsoplotR, which has minimal dependencies and works on a basic R installation. It only uses commands that have been part of the R programming language for many decades and are unlikely to change in the future. In contrast, the GUI is written in html and Javascript and interacts with IsoplotR via an interface library. This interface is currently provided by the shiny package. shiny is free, open, and popular among R developers but has two important limitations: (1) it was created and is owned by a private company, which reduces the software’s future proofness; (2) shiny is a rather ‘bloated’ piece of code that does much more than is needed for IsoplotRgui. To avoid these issues, shinylight is a light-weight alternative to shiny that allows websites to call R functions in a similar fashion to the way in which node.js allows websites to use Javascript as a server language. Shinylight has been integrated in IsoplotRgui and all future software deliverables of the ‘Beyond Isoplot’ project, including the upcoming 'simplex' program for SIMS data processing.