Format

PDF

126 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 126
  • Categories  

    Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

  • Categories  

    QICS (Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage) was a program funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with support from the Scottish Government (May 2010 - December 2014) with two objectives. Firstly, to assess if any significant environmental impact would arise, if a leak from sub-sea, deep geological storage of carbon dioxide occurred. Secondly, to test and recommend tools and strategies for monitoring for (or assuring the absence of) leakage at the sea floor and in overlying waters. This data set provides a short overview of the novel experimental procedure - a world first leakage simulation in the natural environment and describes the experimental set up, sampling strategy including both temporal and spatial details. The data set consists of a pdf containing a text based project and experimental overview, a table outlining the temporal evolution of the experiment, including site selection, set up, baseline, impact and recovery phases and a diagram outlining the spatial sampling strategy. This data set contains an overview document collated by Plymouth Marine Laboratory. This provides the context for a number of specific related QICS datasets submitted to the UKCCS data archive, covering a range of geological, chemical and ecological information. QICS project website: www.bgs.ac.uk/qics/home.html. Blackford et al., 2014. Detection and impacts of leakage from sub-seafloor deep geological carbon dioxide storage. Nature Climate Change 4, 1011-1016. DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE2381. Taylor et al., 2015. A novel sub-seabed CO2 release experiment informing monitoring and impact assessment for geological carbon storage. Int J Greenhouse Gas Control. DOI:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.09.007.

  • Categories  

    Offprints of articles relating to Geomagnetism from 1822 to 1981. Offprints collected by Kew Observatory, Meteorological Office, Edinburgh and Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux castle). The first page of each offprint has been digitised to produce a finding aid.

  • Categories  

    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter is devoted to the transportation and injection infrastructure requirements of the Kingsnorth Carbon Capture and Storage development. This encompasses a 36 inch (outside diameter) pipeline which runs onshore for approx 10 km and offshore in the Southern North Sea for 260 km, a platform in the vicinity of the Hewett field location, and appropriate facilities both for the conditioning of CO2 before pipeline entry and the processing of the CO2 stream prior to injection into the sequestration site. The chapter highlights in particular the following areas:- Critical assumptions; Platform Concept Selection; Transport Solution Selection; Pipeline Key Issues; Pipeline Pre-Commissioning; Temperature; Emergency Shutdown; Personnel Safety; Venting; Flow Assurance Modelling. Throughout the execution of the work described in this chapter significant opportunity was taken to ensure that the interfaces from capture (and compression) to pipeline/platform and to wells/storage were managed closely. This was achieved by cross system interface management meetings organized to consider interface issues and to compare issues raised in separate HAZIDs. The purpose of conceptual design has been to identify the problems to be addressed comprehensively by the next stage of FEED and this suite of reports provides valuable insights to the challenges faced. All aspects of establishing an agreed philosophy for design and operation of a storage and transport system for CCS begin with understanding what the initial CO2 flow conditions will be at the interface between the well perforations and the reservoir (i.e. at the sandstone face at the bottom of the well). Further supporting documents for chapter 6 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded.

  • Categories  

    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter contains design philosophy documents which were produced to ensure a common approach to the design of all aspects of the CCS project, addressing overall project lifecycle and the interface between the Carbon Capture Plant and the Power Station. Some of the key issues concerning the design and integration of a CCS development are: Power plants have been designed for many years to operate flexibly in response to the demands of the electricity network. The CCS plant technology is closer to process plant technology which is not usually designed for such flexible operation, and this will provide a key challenge during the detailed design process to provide the required flexibility of operation; Assessment of various cooling technologies for the power station and carbon capture plant shows that direct water cooling is the Best Available Technology in terms of Environmental Impact; Significant parts of the existing cooling water infrastructure can be re-used; There is potential to advantageously interface steam and cooling systems between the power plant and CCS plant; Venting, and the consequent cooling, of CO2 for pressure relief or operational reasons raises issues with lack of buoyancy and dispersion which require significant further work. Further supporting documents for chapter 4 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/project_design/project_design.aspx

  • Categories  

    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter presents the Health and Safety Reports produced during the current FEED stage. HAZID/ENVID studies were carried out for the following sections of the project: Kingsnorth Power Plant (impact on and from CCS); Kingsnorth CO2 capture and compression plant; CO2 Pipeline (On and Offshore); Kingsnorth CO2 Injection Platform; Wells and Reservoirs. The results of the HAZID studies for the power plant and capture and compression plant are recorded in the 'HAZID Report' and 'HAZID Report Addendum' in this Chapter. The pipeline and platform HAZID is in section 6 and the wells and reservoirs HAZID in section 7. Other reviews, such as SIMOPS (Simultaneous Operations) studies have been carried out. A review of Major Accident Hazards for the pipeline has been undertaken and the outcome is described in the report 'ALARP Review Report for Genesis Scope of Work'. Design Risk Assessments (DRAs) were carried out by the design teams, with support from the Safety Consultant. DRAs were qualitative rather than quantitative, due to the early stage of design within FEED. The DRAs are collated and summarised in the 'CDM Design Risk Register'. A draft Pre-Construction Safety Report has been produced to further inform the design process, and enhance our understanding of the significant hazards, both safety and environmental, associated with these processes. This overall approach to Health and Safety is set out in more detail in the 'Health and Safety Design Philosophy' Further supporting documents for chapter 8 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded.

  • Categories  

    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a preliminary Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study has yielded invaluable knowledge on areas including project design, technical design, health and safety, environment, consents and project management. The E.ON UK FEED study material is available for download.

  • Categories  

    Publication associated with NERC grant NE/I014039/1. In this paper, we discuss how the initial stages of mass gain are affected by the specific surface area (SSA) of the ceramic material. The paper provides guidance on experimental protocols to avoid dating results being distorted by relatively early-time mass gain data.

  • Categories  

    Data produced from NERC Grant NE/L000059/1 - IODP Exp 335 report which is open access and includes all the observations and other data generated on the Expedition. http://publications.iodp.org/proceedings/335/335toc.htm

  • Categories  

    The dataset created includes natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) of archive-half core sections recovered at nine sites (i.e. Sites U1422, U1423, U1424, U1425, U1426, U1427, U1428, U1429, and U1430) during IODP Expedition 346. NRM of the archive-half core sections were measured at every 5-cm interval resolution before and after 20-mT alternating field (AF) demagnetisation treatment. The dataset created also includes NRM of discrete samples taken from working-half core sections (typically one discrete sample per core from the longest hole at each drilling site). NRM of discrete samples were measured before and after a complete stepwise AF demagnetisation routine (up to 60-mT peak AF field). All NRM data collected were used to construct magnetostratigraphy for all sites drilled during Expedition 346. All data have been published in IODP proceedings Volume 346 (http://publications.iodp.org/proceedings/346/346toc.htm).