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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides details on the organisation and management of the design as well as key design information for the End-to-End CCS chain. This includes the following: Organisation of the design teams; The End-to-End Basis of Design; The design life; The End-to-End CCS chain process; Piping and instrumentation diagrams; Plant and site layout drawings for the various sites; Equipment; Plant and equipment specifications; Subsurface engineering design reports; No attempt has been made to generalise design data. All of the design information presented is specific to the ScottishPower Consortium Project and has been presented to provide an insight into the development of the End-to-End CCS solution. The FEED design study was based on the Outline Solution developed by the Consortium prior to FEED. The Outline Solution was a conceptual design for the End-to-End CCS chain that was considered to be technically feasible within the constraints of the knowledge available at the time. It included a series of optioneering studies to identify the preferred design for this particular project. During FEED, the Outline Solution design was developed in greater detail to reduce the cost and technical uncertainty, and consequently reduce the financial, programme and technical risks prior to commencing the implementation stage of the project. It must be stressed that a FEED study is carried out to develop a design to the degree that the technical and programme risks are reduced to the agreed limits to better inform the project cost estimate. The current status is that the design has been progressed as far as is practicable within the time and cost constraints of the FEED study. Specifications and datasheets for major equipment have been developed in order that they can be issued to potential suppliers during the implementation phase of the project. The FEED study identified further activities that cannot be performed at the FEED stage of the project but which have been recorded as actions for further investigation during the implementation stage. The FEED study has advanced the development of the application of CCS technology considerably. Though research and conceptual studies are essential to the development of any new technology, they cannot identify many of the difficult design issues that are identified and addressed during a FEED study. Similarly the progress from FEED to the implementation phase is expected to present further challenges for a project of this novel nature. However, the advantage of a FEED study is that the main issues that could present high cost or programme difficulties or even potential 'show stoppers' should already have been identified and, where possible, addressed. Key decisions and design changes taken during the FEED study are explained in Section 11 of the report. The FEED study indicates that CCS remains technically feasible. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Design.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files.

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This chapter contains the output from many of the Project Management processes which control and report the progress of the FEED. The following commentary gives the reader a brief guide to the project management process or approach which has been used. FEED Programme: In order to scope out, control and report the FEED activity, a Work Breakdown Structure was developed. This structure had the following hierarchy - Level 1 - Chain Element; Level 2 - Phase; Level 3 - Discipline; Level 4 - Work Package (including Cost Time Resource definition); The programme is in the form of a fully resource loaded, logically linked network diagram. Risk Management: Throughout this FEED the management of risk was a key activity. This has helped inform and better understand the important risks faced by the project. This 'first of a kind' project saw a large number of new risks being identified, assessed, controlled and monitored during FEED. Project Cost Estimates: An estimating philosophy was established in FEED to set the standards for the estimates produced from across the project participants, including: To ensure a consistent approach in the collection, calculation and presentation of costs across all FEED Participants; To ensure that all likely project costs are identified and captured along with all associated details. A standard template was established for each participant to complete with the details of their section (i.e. Chain Element) of the cost estimate. The cost estimate was broadly consistent with Class 3/4 estimate as defined by AACE. Further supporting documents for chapter 10 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/abstract/abstract.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report aims to inform potential developers of CCS of the impact of risks on the design of large-scale CCS. It discusses the ScottishPower CCS Consortium approach to risk management, looking particularly at the identification and mitigation of specific areas of risks during FEED and the mitigating actions required for the major residual risks. The section covers five key areas: Overview of the risk assessment process through FEED, including mitigation measures, major movement of the Top 50 risks on the Risk Register, and current active risks; Mitigation strategies for major project risks; Mitigation strategies for those risks with the potential to cause significant delay to the Overall Project Programme; Allocation and insurability of risks; Integrity and risk assessment of existing plant to be integrated; From the outset of FEED, risk management was co-ordinated by the Risk Workstream. The Risk Workstream included representatives of each of the Consortium Partners and Aker Clean Carbon. The Risk Workstream had a remit to capture, codify and report on progress with risk management throughout the study. The management of the risks themselves remained with the risk owners. The Consortium's risk management strategy was based on the provision of a cross-Consortium, over-arching risk management framework. This was developed to: Provide visibility of the Consortium's risk exposure Make best use of the Consortium Partners' risk management experience Facilitate the assessment of the impact of changes within the scope of one Partner's risk profile to the others Encourage the identification of risks at Partner interfaces Provide consistent risk reporting across the Consortium in line with agreed requirements Each Consortium Partner was responsible for reporting monthly on their risks to the Consortium risk lead, who in turn collated the Consortium Partner updates and reported the overall Consortium risk status to the Consortium Management Office and DECC to show how the total risk value changed over the course of FEED. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Risk management.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/risk/risk.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. The UK Government's basic premise for financially supporting CCS demonstration is to facilitate further commercial scale CCS projects in the UK and internationally. DECC have made knowledge transfer activities a key requirement of the UKCCS Demonstration Competition. The Consortium identified stakeholder groups particularly relevant for knowledge transfer activities. Stakeholders were categorised in terms of: Knowledge needs; Potential to influence CCS deployment; Experience/ expertise they can bring to demonstration knowledge; Potential to disseminate demonstration knowledge; The assessment identified six priority audience groups: Academics, Environmental NGOs, Finance and Insurance, Industry, Initiatives and Developers and Regulatory and Policy. The Stakeholder Profiling Interviews sought to answer the following questions: Who are the key CCS stakeholders? What information are these stakeholders interested in from a CCS demonstration? What are the preferred methods for key stakeholders to receive and access information? Are the key stakeholders interested in interacting with CCS demonstrations, and if so, what is the preferred method to facilitate this interaction? This section of the FEED Close Out Report combines over 30 stakeholder interviews, with examples of knowledge transfer leading practice. Other FEED workstreams considered wider stakeholder engagement, for example, local community engagement and public communication. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Stakeholder profiling.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/stakeholder/stakeholder.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides details of the regulatory work carried out during FEED to achieve the legal requirements of constructing and operating an End-to-End CCS system within European, UK and Scottish legislative frameworks, including implications for consenting of the power plant from which CO2 is to be captured. During the development of the Outline Solution for the UKCCS Demonstration Competition, the Consortium developed a comprehensive Consents Register that tracks month by month progress and captures all relevant Consents, permits and licenses required by the End-to-End CCS chain. A summary of the Consortium progress as of the end of Q1 2011 is provided. Written against a backdrop of significant regulatory change and uncertainty, this report also outlines the process undertaken in identifying consenting risk and provides commentary on the key risks identified, as contained within the project Risk Register. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Consents and permitting.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/consents/consents.aspx

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    Geomorphological map of the Sutlej and Yamuna fans, northwestern India. Grant abstract: India is the largest agricultural user of groundwater in the world. The last 40 years has seen a revolutionary shift from large-scale surface water management to widespread groundwater abstraction, particularly in the northwestern states of Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan. As a result of this, northwestern India is now a hotspot of groundwater depletion, with 'the largest rate of groundwater loss in any comparable-sized region on Earth' (Tiwari et al., 2009). This unsustainable use of groundwater becomes even more challenging when set increasing demands from a burgeoning population and industrialisation, together with potential but poorly understood effects of climate-driven changes in the water cycle. There are a number of innovative socio-economic strategies that can address this issue, including enhanced recharge and subsurface water storage, but their implementation and success depend on solid regional understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the aquifer systems, and of the patterns and rates of groundwater flow and recharge. What we know about regional groundwater resources comes largely from either low-resolution studies based on satellite data, or from local investigations; there has been no large-scale, cross-state integrated study of the groundwater system. Groundwater in northwestern India is thought to be largely hosted within buried, sandy former river channels, which extend from the Himalayas toward the southwest and are separated by fine-grained muds. Only a few channels are visible at the surface; most are buried and their existence must be inferred. Our approach is founded on the premise that we must first understand the geology and geometry of the aquifer system before we can hope to estimate the way it will respond to a complex set of future stresses. This means that we must be able to describe the locations, sizes, and characteristics of these channels as well as their age and three-dimensional pattern. Once these characteristics are determined, we can forecast the likely future behaviour of the system. In this proposal, we will provide, for the first time, a regional assessment of the aquifer system in northwestern India, along with models for its evolution under changes in the water cycle and in the way in which groundwater is used. Our project will combine expertise in sedimentology, stratigraphy, sediment routing and basin evolution, hydrology, and isotope geochemistry to understand the geological framework of the aquifer system, the ages of the groundwaters within it, and the ways in which groundwater levels are likely to evolve over the next 50 years. The outcomes of the proposal will include (1) a comprehensive data base that covers the northwestern Indian aquifer system, (2) much better understanding of regional sources, ages, and flow rates of groundwater, and (3) a suite of predictions for how the groundwater system will respond to a range of different future scenarios.

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    Core description, core samples and thin sections of Lower Carboniferous dolomite. Thesis : Reservoir Properties of Lower Carboniferous Limestone of the Derbyshire East Midlands Platform by Jack Stacey. Thesis: Advances in understanding the evolution of diagenesis in carboniferous carbonate platforms: insights from simulations of palaeohydrology, geochemistry, and stratigraphic development by Miles Frazer

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    The two earthquake scenario narratives are communications tools created to engage the local population and policy makers in Weinan city. They will be uploaded on the Overseas Development Institute website and be publicly accessible.

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    This database comprises field notebooks reporting geological field work associated with NERC Standard Grant NE/R001324/1 from 1/10/2017 – 30/6/2021. The fieldwork involved examination of Ordovician – Devonian sequences from North Wales and Scotland. Samples were collected for palynological analysis. Palynological processing involves the recovery of organic-walled microfossils by hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acid maceration. Details of other non-NERC-funded fieldwork undertaken during this period is included in the field notebooks.

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter is devoted to the transportation and injection infrastructure requirements of the Kingsnorth Carbon Capture and Storage development. This encompasses a 36 inch (outside diameter) pipeline which runs onshore for approx 10 km and offshore in the Southern North Sea for 260 km, a platform in the vicinity of the Hewett field location, and appropriate facilities both for the conditioning of CO2 before pipeline entry and the processing of the CO2 stream prior to injection into the sequestration site. The chapter highlights in particular the following areas:- Critical assumptions; Platform Concept Selection; Transport Solution Selection; Pipeline Key Issues; Pipeline Pre-Commissioning; Temperature; Emergency Shutdown; Personnel Safety; Venting; Flow Assurance Modelling. Throughout the execution of the work described in this chapter significant opportunity was taken to ensure that the interfaces from capture (and compression) to pipeline/platform and to wells/storage were managed closely. This was achieved by cross system interface management meetings organized to consider interface issues and to compare issues raised in separate HAZIDs. The purpose of conceptual design has been to identify the problems to be addressed comprehensively by the next stage of FEED and this suite of reports provides valuable insights to the challenges faced. All aspects of establishing an agreed philosophy for design and operation of a storage and transport system for CCS begin with understanding what the initial CO2 flow conditions will be at the interface between the well perforations and the reservoir (i.e. at the sandstone face at the bottom of the well). Further supporting documents for chapter 6 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded.