From 1 - 10 / 72
  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Investigating the radiative heat flux in small and large scale oxy-coal furnaces for CFD model development and system scale up, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-193.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Process-performance indexed design of task-specific ionic liquids for post-combustion CO2 capture, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-199.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, UK demonstration of Enhanced Calcium looping, and first Global Demonstration of Advanced Doping Techniques, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-209.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Performance of Flow Meters with Dense Phase CO2 and CCS Recovery Streams, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-201.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Multiscale characterization of CO2 storage in the United Kingdom, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-197.

  • Categories  

    This report has been superseded by the paper: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1750583617301081. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-31. The NERC-funded QICS controlled CO2 release experiment (located offshore Oban, Scotland) mimics the formation of a new CO2 seep in the marine environment. At the site, CO2 is injected at an onshore well head, and a stainless steel pipe transports the CO2 under the seabed. Approximately 350 m offshore, the CO2 is released through a perforated screen into the 12 metres of overlying marine sediment, which is at approximately 10 metres water depth. During spring/summer 2012, 4.2 tonnes of CO2 was released at the QICS experimental site. A key element of risk assessment for the subsurface storage of CO2 is the monitoring of leaks from the subsurface in to the marine or terrestrial environments via sediments and soils. Chemical 'fingerprinting' of injected CO2 is widely considered a low cost, highly effective monitoring option, since effective application of tracers in CCS could provide information on (i) the movement, interaction and fate of injected CO2 in the subsurface and (ii) the detection (and quantification) of CO2 that has leaked from the storage complex to the surface. There is a need to develop geochemical techniques to differentiate between CO2 from natural processes, and the QICS site may provide excellent opportunity to trial geochemical tracers. This work aims to determine which chemical tracers are most suitable for CO2 tracing at the QICS facility and the research questions that tracer application can address. As such, this report includes: i. A review of current potential chemical tracers for CCS and their applications. ii. An analysis and comparison of costs, availability, environmental impact and detection limits for potential tracers. iii. An assessment of the above in the context of QICS (i.e: considering the CO2 will be released from the seabed (having passed from dense to gas phase), and having passed through water saturated sediment of the seabed, and into the water column. iv. An overview of the legal considerations for tracers in the UK. v. The injection method for tracers at the QICS site. vi. Required strategies for sampling the selected tracer. vii. Identify knowledge gaps in tracer studies which experiments at the QICS site could address.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, CO2 Flow Metering through Multi-Modal Sensing and Statistical Data Fusion, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-218.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Towards more flexible power generation with CCS, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-214.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Experimental investigation with PACT facility and CFD modelling of oxy-coal combustion with recycling real flue gas was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-27. Oxy-coal combustion technology has gained confidence and maturity especially within the last decade (Santos S. 2012) compared to the much earlier studies (Kimura et al., 1995; Wang et al., 1988). However, there are still a number of research challenges associated with flue gas recycling, gas clean-up and plant scale tools and models. Flue gas recycling affects the purity of CO2, oxygen mixing, and ignition of coal particles and flame stability. There is lack of experimental data with real flue gas recycling or treated vent gas recycling, which is one of the available options to achieve the target of zero emissions (Hack et al., 2011), at pilot-scale for the validation of CFD models. The project focuses on the following tasks: • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion, ignition and flame stability with the 250kWth PACT Oxy-Coal Combustion furnace with real and simulated flue gas recycling • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion ignition and flame stability with a laboratory visual drop tube furnace • CFD simulation of the 250kWth PACT Oxy-coal combustion furnace.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Tractable equations of state for CO2 mixtures in CCS was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-22. A potential bottle-neck for CCS is the transport of CO2 from power plants to the storage location, by pipeline. Key to safe and inexpensive transport is a detailed understanding of the physical properties of carbon dioxide. However, no gas separation process is 100% efficient, and the resulting carbon dioxide contains a number of different impurities. These impurities can greatly influence the physical properties of the fluid compared to pure CO2. They have important design, safety and cost implications for the compression and transport of carbon dioxide. This project aimed to develop new methods to produce custom models (equations of state) for impure CO2 behaviour for CCS.