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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, CO2 Flow Metering through Multi-Modal Sensing and Statistical Data Fusion, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-218.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Determination of water Solubility in CO2 Mixtures, was presented at the Cambridge Biannual, 02.04.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-21.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Experimental investigation with PACT facility and CFD modelling of oxy-coal combustion with recycling real flue gas was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-27. Oxy-coal combustion technology has gained confidence and maturity especially within the last decade (Santos S. 2012) compared to the much earlier studies (Kimura et al., 1995; Wang et al., 1988). However, there are still a number of research challenges associated with flue gas recycling, gas clean-up and plant scale tools and models. Flue gas recycling affects the purity of CO2, oxygen mixing, and ignition of coal particles and flame stability. There is lack of experimental data with real flue gas recycling or treated vent gas recycling, which is one of the available options to achieve the target of zero emissions (Hack et al., 2011), at pilot-scale for the validation of CFD models. The project focuses on the following tasks: • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion, ignition and flame stability with the 250kWth PACT Oxy-Coal Combustion furnace with real and simulated flue gas recycling • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion ignition and flame stability with a laboratory visual drop tube furnace • CFD simulation of the 250kWth PACT Oxy-coal combustion furnace.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Novel Materials and Reforming Process Route for the Production of Ready-Separated CO2/N2/H2 from Natural Gas Feedstocks was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-181. Large reserves of shale gas and unconventional gases worldwide will ensure that hydrogen remains produced mainly via the catalytic steam reforming process (C-SR) for the next few decades. In conventional C-SR, the most energy intensive step is the production of syngas (CO+H2) in the primary reformer which relies on fired heaters in large scale furnaces. SR plants need to be enormous in order to be economical due to syngas production stage and H2 purification steps.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Quantifying Residual and Dissolution Trapping in the CO2CRC Otway Injection Site, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-204.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project UK Demonstration of Enhanced Calcium Looping and first Global Demonstration of Advanced Doping Techniques was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-209. Calcium (carbonate) looping is a promising carbon capture technology, which has been successfully demonstrated using a slip stream from the exhaust of a large-scale power plant. CO2 is captured as CaCO3, and is then calcined to release a pure stream of CO2 suitable for storage. The main advantage of this cycle is that the exothermic CO2 capture stage takes place around 650°C and the heat released in the carbonation process can be used in a standard steam cycle. The aims of this project are: • To demonstrate the viability of enhanced calcium looping technologies for CCS using a pelletized spent lime stream. • To demonstrate the viability of calcium looping for the removal of CO2 from industrial gases (steel and iron industry and cement industry). • To explore the use of enhanced Ca looping using HBr as doping agent.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Flexible CCS Network Development (FleCCSnet) was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-40. The aim of the project was to carry out research to enable the production of design and operating guidelines for CCS pipeline networks in order that these networks can react effectively to short, medium and long term variations in the availability and flow of CO2 from capture plants and also to the constraints imposed on the system by the ability (or otherwise) of CO2 storage facilities to accept variable flow. The amount of CO2 captured at a power station is expected to become more variable in the future as the electricity grid brings in more and more intermittent renewable energy (meaning a conventional power station is temporarily not needed or in reduced operation as the renewable energy takes precedent). The storage site will also face periods of maintenance which will impose constraints on the flow into the store and it is also important to look at the case of upset conditions in order to be able to predict any potential problems. Solutions to these all these issues need to be factored into the design of the CCS network, the focus of the project was to identify the issues surrounding flexibility and explore some of them.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Flexible CCS Network Development, was presented at the Cambridge Biannual, 02.04.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-40.

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    UKCCSRC Call 2 Project C2-189. The data, which was produced as a result of a UK CCSRC Call 2 funded project, consists of the GC-MS characterisation results for the products collected from the rejuvenation tests of degraded amine sorbents from carbon capture and related model degradation compounds. The examined amine-based sorbent samples included one heavily degraded industrial MEA solvent, one degraded solid-supported polyethyleneimine sample and 6 model MEA degradation compounds (N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediamine, glycylglycine, 2-Oxazolidinone, 1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-2-imidazolidinone, 1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-imidazole, N-Acetylethanolamine. Novel reductive approaches, which were investigated as a potential means for rejuvenating the degraded amine sorbents and where the samples for characterisation were produced, included catalytic hydrogenation, hydrous pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis with platinum, nickel and molybdenum as the catalysts used. The dataset also contains some preliminary CO2 absorption test results for a degraded MEA solvent before and after rejuvenation with hydrous pyrolysis using a continuous reactor. Full technical details of the research are contained in the final report submitted to UK CCSRC.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Towards more flexible power generation with CCS was presented at the UKCCSRC Manchester Biannual Meeting, 13.04.2016. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-214.