Creation year

2014

133 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 133
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    This INSPIRE network service provides an Atom feed of predefined datasets that are available for download.

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    Scanned images of 78 maps covering 13 National Grid 1:10,560 map areas in the area of the Lothian oil-shale field. Each map shows the extent of a single oil shale seam. They were published between 1977 and 1982 by the Institute of Geological Sciences in Edinburgh. The original maps were scanned in 2014.

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    The Quaternary deposits thickness dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200m, which shows the thickness of the deposits over bedrock in three categories: <5m, 5-50m, and >50m Quaternary cover. These depth bands were picked because they represent the horizons that have impact on offshore infrastructure deployment. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1000000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile.

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    These maps provide an overview, at the national scale, of the spatial relationships between principal aquifers and some of the major shale and clay units in England and Wales. The data comprises a series of occurrence maps shows the distribution of rock units that form the principal aquifers and some major shale and clay units in England and Wales. In addition, a series of separation maps show the vertical separation between pairs of shales or clays and overlying aquifers. If shale gas resources are to be developed in the UK, the implications for groundwater will need to be considered as part of any risk assessment. A step in such an assessment will be to understand and quantify the spatial relationships between the potential shale gas source rocks (including both shales and some clay units) and overlying aquifers. The datasets used to produce the aquifer maps, the shale and clay occurrence maps and the separation maps are available to download for your own use. As with other BGS data sets available for download, this will enable you to work offline to develop your own systems and methodologies using BGS data. The data used to produce the aquifer, shale and clay maps are available below as ESRI GIS and KML files.

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    This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the susceptibility of corroded underground ferrous (iron) assets (e.g. pipes) to failure, as a result of ground instability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains eight fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where corroded ferrous assets may fail. The other seven fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to corrosivity and hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where underground ferrous assets are susceptible to failure as a result of ground conditions.

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    Scanned copies of Scottish 1 inch scale maps which are annotated with fossil locations and geology. Printed topography with hand annotated fossil locations and geology with cross sections and colour-wash with index and observations. Considered working material towards published geological maps.

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    Scanned images of seismic phase data sheets containing phase readings, phase arrival times, amplitude data, magnitude data and derived source information like hypocentres (locations), fault plane solutions etc for earthquakes recorded by BGS seismic stations. The data is in the format used by the location program HYPO71 (Lee & Lahr, 1975) which was the most used program for local earthquakes.

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    Groundwater temperature data from a shallow urban aquifer in Cardiff, Wales, UK between 2014-2018. Monitoring was undertaken as part of the ‘Cardiff Urban Geo-Observatory’ project . Boreholes are located within the urban area of the City of Cardiff, Wales, UK. The majority of temperature sensors were installed within boreholes that monitor a shallow Quaternary aged sand and gravel aquifer, however the made ground and the Triassic Mercia Mudstone also represented. Temperature sensors installed in 53 boreholes, between depths of 1.5m and 12- m below ground, with measurements every 30 minutes. The dataset comprises of just over 3.5 million temperature measurements. Monitoring was undertaken by the British Geological Survey and was designed to address knowledge gaps of subsurface urban heat island and it use for heat recovery and storage. Metadata Report http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/525332/

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    This data was collected as a part of the UK CCS Research Centre Call 2 Project C2-197: Multi scale characterisation of CO2 Storage in the United Kingdom. This is tabular data and X-ray imagery of drainage and imbibition relative permeability measured on reservoir rocks from the S. North Sea, N. North Sea, and E. Irish Sea of the Offshore UK. The data were obtained through measurements made at two distinct flow rates to allow for an evaluation of the impact of rock heterogeneity. Full details of the rock properties and experiments can be found in Reynolds et al. (2018) reference 3 below, the Final Report of the Project, as well as in the PhD Thesis of Catriona Reynolds with full references given below. Any use of the data should reference the journal article, reference 3 below. Geographical Area - Bunter sandstone in S. North Sea, Cleethorpes-1 Well, 1312.7-1316.1 m depth; Ormsirk sandstone in E. Irish Sea, Block 110/2a, 1247.9-1248.1 m depth; Captain sandstone in N. North Sea, Well 14/29a-3, 2997.6-3005.1 m depth. References 1. Imperial College London and British Geological Survey, Multiscale Characterisation of CO2 Storage in the United Kingdom, UKCCSRC Call 2 Project Final Report, 2016 2. Reynolds, C. Two-phase flow behaviour and relative permeability between CO2 and brine in sandstones at the pore and core scales, PhD Thesis, 2016, Imperial College London. 3. Reynolds, C.A., Blunt, M.J., Krevor, S. 2018, Multiphase flow characteristics of heterogeneous rocks from CO2 storage reservoirs in the United Kingdom, Water Resources Research, 54, 2, 729-745

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Investigating the radiative heat flux in small and large scale oxy-coal furnaces for CFD model development and system scale up, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-193.