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2014

134 record(s)
 
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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Oxyfuel and exhaust gas recirculation processes in gas turbine combustion for improved carbon capture performance was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-26. This research is concerned with oxyfuel combustion in gas turbine applications, in particular concentrating on the use of modern swirl-stabilised burners. Oxyfuel is considered a particularly challenging idea, since the resultant burning velocity and flame temperatures will be significantly higher than what might be deemed as a practical or workable technology. For this reason it is widely accepted that EGR-derived CO2 will be used as a diluent and moderator for the reaction (in essence replacing the role of atmospheric nitrogen). The key challenges in developing oxyfuel gas turbine technology are therefore: • Flame stability at high temperatures and burning rates. • The use of CO2 as a combustion diluent. • Potential for CO emission into the capture plant. • Wide or variable operating envelopes across diluent concentrations. • Differences in the properties of N2 and CO2 giving rise to previously unmeasured flame heat release locations.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Novel Materials and Reforming Processing Route for the Production of Ready-Separated CO2/N2/H2 from Natural Gas Feedstocks, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-181.

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    The dataset contains 15 plots and data for time-dependent pressures and temperatures at various locations along a 2582-m-long well and at various simulation times. The realistic scenarios taken into considerations are applied to the Goldeneye depleted reservoir in the North Sea. Pure CO2 is injected into the well and then discharged in the Goldeneye reservoir. Six different scenarios are considered: three different injection durations (linear ramp-up of the inlet mass flow rate from 0 to 33.5 kg/s over 5 minutes, 30 minutes, and 2 hours) and two different upstream temperatures (278.15 K and 283.15 K). Data is currently restricted until publication.

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    Fiscal metering could face several challenges during CO2 transport by pipelines due to the unusual physical properties of CO2 and CO2 mixtures. Coriolis flowmeters are an options to measure CO2 accurately in transport pipelines. However, the presence of impurities can affect the performance of the flowmeter. Therefore, the performance of a Coriolis flowmeter was evaluated using CO2 fluid with impurities in a mass flow-rig designed based on the gravimetric calibration in start / stop operations. In each test, the mass recorded by the Coriolis flowmeter was compared to the mass collected in the receiving facilities and measured using high accurate balance in order to obtain the relative deviation of the test. During the tests, in addition to the mass and volume flow rate, the operational pressure and temperature as well as velocity and density were recorded. The series of tests were conducted using different fluids, including: pure N2 (validation tests), pure CO2 (reference tests), pre-combustion mixture, post-combustion mixture, Oxyfuel-I mixture and Oxyfuel-II mixture. The recorded data as well as recorded and measured masses are available in the provided excel files for each investigated fluid. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-201

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    Increased population and increased economic activity have one important thing in common: increased energy demand. More and more, concern is mounting surrounding the broader environmental impact associated with this, and we are forced to consider the harsh reality that societies which systematically abuse and exploit their ecosystems tend not to survive. Historically, once a population had exhausted their local ecosystem, those who could, would relocate to another area, whilst those who could not tended to die out. In our globally connected world, we do not have the option of relocation; therefore it is imperative that we find a way to redress the adverse environmental impact that has historically been associated with anthropogenic economic activity. This work proposes to address one important aspect of this challenge; how to decarbonise power generation in a costeffective and environmentally benign manner. First patented in 1932, amine-based technologies for removing CO2 from the exhaust gases of large industrial processes are a well accepted and mature option. However, their deployment on a scale commensurate with the power generation industry would entail their utilisation on a scale of an entirely different order of magnitude. This step change brings with it two important challenges; the large cost resulting from the capital and ongoing operational cost associated with the deployment of CCS and also the possibility of ancillary environmental concerns resulting from the release of amines and their associated degradation products into the wider environment. This research proposes to solve this problem by using a new class of material, ionic liquids, for solvent based CO2 capture to produce carbon negative electricity - in effect taking CO2 out of the atmosphere and ultimately reversing global warming. Ionic liquids are an exciting new class of materials which, rather than being composed of molecules, are composed of individual anions and cations which interact to define their thermophysical properties. They are almost infinitely tunable as one can in effect design a task specific ionic liquid for a particular property, e.g., to absorb CO2. However, there is an important challenge associated with this; the sheer size of the potential design space. At the time of writing, there are approximately 109 potential combinations on anion and cation - far too many for design by experiment or heuristic. Thus, this research proposes to tackle this problem by performing this material design in a computational environment using a process performance index. In other words, the development and incorporation of a new theory for designing task specific ionic liquids in dynamic non-equilibrium models of a CO2 capture process and proposing new ionic liquids based on how they affect the efficiency of the power plant to which these processes are attached. The success criteria of this project are the development of a new, environmentally benign ionic liquids based CO2 capture process which reduces the cost of capture by approximately 40% in comparison with the current benchmark technology. Vital to the success of this work is the cutting edge collaboration between experimental and theoretical research groups in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Centre for Environmental Policy at Imperial College London in addition to leading research groups in the Join BioEnergy Institute in San Francisco, USA. Important outputs of this work will be new technologies for the design of task specific ionic liquids in addition to designs operational strategies for ionic liquids based CO2 capture from large fixed point emission sources. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-199.

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    EPSRC project EP/K035878/1 - DiSECCS research has focussed on developing advanced seismic monitoring tools and combining these with social science research to identify key factors in establishing trust and confidence in the storage system.This report presents insights into and recommendations for the monitoring systems and protocols required to maintain the integrity of storage reservoirs suitable for large-scale CO2 storage and for obtaining a social licence to operate a CCS project.

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    This presentation on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Novel reductive rejuvenation approaches for degraded amine solutions from PCC in power plants was presented at the UKCCSRC Manchester Biannual Meeting, 13.04.2016. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-189.

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    The aim of this proposal is to develop and validate a multi-phase flow model for simulating the highly transient flow phenomena taking place in the well-bore during start-up injection of CO2 mixtures into depleted gas fields. The objectives are to: 1.demonstrate the usefulness of the model developed based on its application to a real system as a test case; 2.use the findings in (1) to propose optimum injection strategies and develop Best Practice Guidelines for minimising the risks associated with the start-up injection of CO2 into depleted gas reservoirs. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-183.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, UK demonstration of Enhanced Calcium looping, and first Global Demonstration of Advanced Doping Techniques, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-209.

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    This presentation on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Performance of Flow Meters with Dense Phase CO2 and CCS Recovery Streams was presented at the UKCCSRC Edinburgh Biannual Meeting, 15.09.2016. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-201.