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2014

133 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 133
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    This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the potential for leakage to have a negative effect on ground stability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains seven fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where leakage may affect ground stability. The other six fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to the extent to which hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands will be increased due to leakage. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where. and to what extent, leaking underground pipes or other structures may initate or worsen ground stability.

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    Scanned images of 78 maps covering 13 National Grid 1:10,560 map areas in the area of the Lothian oil-shale field. Each map shows the extent of a single oil shale seam. They were published between 1977 and 1982 by the Institute of Geological Sciences in Edinburgh. The original maps were scanned in 2014.

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    The DiGMap Plus dataset is a series of GIS layers describing the engineering, geochemical and geophysical properties of geological materials from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m depth (ie the uppermost c.2m of geology). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core characteristics relating to their lithologies. The 'Resistivity' dataset covers England, Scotland and Wales and characterises the material resistivity (based on modelled distributions of clay and moisture content, to 2m depth.

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    The Quaternary deposits thickness dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200m, which shows the thickness of the deposits over bedrock in three categories: <5m, 5-50m, and >50m Quaternary cover. These depth bands were picked because they represent the horizons that have impact on offshore infrastructure deployment. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1000000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile.

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    The dataset comprises scanned images of maps and aerial photographs of the Falkland Islands. The original maps are printers films and final paper printed originals of Falkland Islands OS maps, compiled for the Falkland Islands Government and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office by the Overseas Directorate of the Ordnance Survey. The Falkland Islands Government retains copyright interest in the maps. There are no access or usage constraints for BGS staff for BGS purposes. The field slips of geological maps were compiled by BGS under contract to the Falkland Islands Government. Copyright remains with the Falkland Islands Government , but there are no access or usage constraints for BGS staff for BGS purposes. Access to both datasets are restricted to BGS staff.

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    This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the susceptibility of corroded underground ferrous (iron) assets (e.g. pipes) to failure, as a result of ground instability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains eight fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where corroded ferrous assets may fail. The other seven fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to corrosivity and hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where underground ferrous assets are susceptible to failure as a result of ground conditions.

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    Airborne geophysical data acquired as part of the BGS-NERC TellusSW project (http://www.tellusgb.ac.uk/) during the second half of 2013. The survey comprised a high resolution magnetic/magnetic gradient survey combined with a multichannel (256 channel) radiometric survey. The survey was carried out using 200m (N-S) line separations at a mean elevation of 91m. Encompassing the counties of Cornwall and parts of Devon and Somerset, the survey provided 60,323 line-km of data. Digital data and derived (e.g. spatial derivatives) maps of the geophysical information are provided to facilitate spatial modelling of the soil, geological and environmental aspects of the data.

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    These maps provide an overview, at the national scale, of the spatial relationships between principal aquifers and some of the major shale and clay units in England and Wales. The data comprises a series of occurrence maps shows the distribution of rock units that form the principal aquifers and some major shale and clay units in England and Wales. In addition, a series of separation maps show the vertical separation between pairs of shales or clays and overlying aquifers. If shale gas resources are to be developed in the UK, the implications for groundwater will need to be considered as part of any risk assessment. A step in such an assessment will be to understand and quantify the spatial relationships between the potential shale gas source rocks (including both shales and some clay units) and overlying aquifers. The datasets used to produce the aquifer maps, the shale and clay occurrence maps and the separation maps are available to download for your own use. As with other BGS data sets available for download, this will enable you to work offline to develop your own systems and methodologies using BGS data. The data used to produce the aquifer, shale and clay maps are available below as ESRI GIS and KML files.

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    This dataset is a characterisation of the soil and rocks and the potential bulking factor (likely excavated volume increases) at Formation (local to regional) level for Great Britain. The data is categorised into Class, characteristics of similar soils and rocks and Bulking Factor, range or ranges of % bulking. The excavation of rocks or soils is usually accompanied by a change in volume. This change in volume is referred to as ‘bulking’ and the measure of the change is the ‘bulking factor’. The bulking factor is used to estimate the likely excavated volumes that will need to be moved, stored on site, or removed from site. It is envisaged that the 'Engineering Properties: Bulking of soils and rocks' dataset will be of use to companies involved in the estimation of the volume of excavated material for civil engineering operations. These operations may include, but are not limited to, resource estimation, transportation, storage, disposal and the use of excavated materials as engineered fill. It forms part of the DiGMap Plus dataset series of GIS layers which describe the engineering properties of materials from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m depth (ie the uppermost c.2m of geology). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core engineering characteristics relating to their lithologies.

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    Scanned images of seismic phase data sheets containing phase readings, phase arrival times, amplitude data, magnitude data and derived source information like hypocentres (locations), fault plane solutions etc for earthquakes recorded by BGS seismic stations. The data is in the format used by the location program HYPO71 (Lee & Lahr, 1975) which was the most used program for local earthquakes.