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    The data shows superficial polygons, bedrock polygons and fault linear geological information, sourced from published Geological Survey of Northern Ireland 1:250 000 scale maps - superficial (Quaternary 1991) and bedrock (Solid 1997). Full Northern Ireland coverage is available (Bedrock extends west into RI). The data is available in vector format. BGS licensing terms and conditions apply to external use of the data.

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    The Quaternary deposits summary lithologies dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200 m, which groups the deposits into classes based on similar engineering geology characteristics. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1,000,000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping, so is effective at that scale. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile The divisions on the map combine the Quaternary deposits into 7 categories of similar strength and lithological variability, each with a ‘Category’ title that summarises their main lithological character: diamict; firm to hard interbedded (layered); firm to hard mud; sand and gravel; soft interbedded; soft mud; undifferentiated. These categories can be used as a basis for assessing, in conjunction with a range of other geological factors, the geological constraints on engineering structures at or close to the seabed.

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    This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows sites where regularly monitored rest water level data are available, usually covering a long time period. The data shows seasonal fluctuations in the water table and responses to periods of high or low rainfall.

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    Two geochemical surveys were undertaken in the Solomon Islands between 1976 and 1983 as part of a combined geological mapping and mineral exploration project. The survey of Choiseul and the Shortland Islands was carried out between 1976 and 1979 by the Institute of Geological Sciences (now the British Geological Survey) with support from staff of the Geology Division of the Ministry of Land, Energy and Natural Resources, Solomon Islands. The project produced 12 geological maps at 1:50,000 scale as well as a series of unpublished reports. The survey of the New Georgia Group of islands was undertaken between 1979 and 1983. The project produced 7 geological maps at a scale of 1:100,000 and a regional map of the entire island group at a scale of 1:250,000. A series of multielement geochemical anomaly maps were produced at a scale of 1:100,000 to accompany each of the published geological maps. Master copies of these are held at the Geological Survey in Honiara. Full descriptions of the methods used are described in the margins of the anomaly maps. A total of 8848 stream sediment samples were collected from Choiseul and 7441 from the New Georgia Group, resulting in an average sampling density for the two areas of 2.68 samples per km2 and 1.47 samples per km2 respectively. Sampling in the Shortland Islands was confined to the larger islands, 187 were collected from the Fauro Island group, 148 from Alu and 69 from Mono. The samples were dry sieved and the fraction passing -80 mesh B.S. (177 microns) was analysed. A hot concentrated nitric acid digestion was used prior to analysis by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry (AAS) for Co, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Mn. Samples from the vicinity of the Siruka Ultramafic Complex were determined for Cr by AAS after digestion by a bisulphate fusion technique. Raw data can be obtained from the Geology Division, Ministry of Mines and Energy, PO Box G37, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

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    The British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) shot approximately 12,000 km of deep, multi-channel seismic reflection data around the British Isles from 1981 to 1991 during 14 surveys. Recording depths vary depending on the purpose of the survey but range from 15 s to 40 s two-way time. Raw and processed digital data are archived by BGS who make the data available subject to the cost of reproduction and handling. Seismic sections and other analogue ancillary data are available for some surveys. Gravity and magnetic data may also be available.

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    The 3D multi channel seismic data were acquired as part of a collaborative investigation into models of magmatic segmentation between the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and BIRPS (the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate). The 3D EPR (East Pacific Rise) ARAD (Anatomy of a Ridge Axis Discontinuity) EW9707 cruise was undertaken in September and October 1997 to provide both refelction and wide-angle seismic data for the study of the overlapping spreading centre (OSC) at 9 degrees 3 minutes N on the East Pacific Rise. The data were acquired with a single source and a single streamer with a nominal line spacing of 100 m. The 3D-EPR ARAD survey was a joint NERC/NSF (US National Science Foundation) funded project and the copyright for this survey is held jointly. Reference: Bazin, S. Harding, AJ. et al. (2001) Three-dimensional shallow crustal emplacement at the 9 degree 03 minute N overlapping spreading center on the East Pacific Rise, Journal of Geophysical Research.

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    This dataset comprises data from Wessex Archaeology surveys which were conducted over various wreck sites between 2003 and 2010. Three of these datasets were acquired in English waters, one in Welsh waters and one in Scottish waters. The geology and geophysics component of the data are archived by British Geological Survey (BGS) in the Marine Environmental data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. The data include multibeam echosounder, single-beam echosounder, sidescan sonar, sub-bottom profiler, magnetometer, and geological data (vibrocore logs and photos). Data were also provided to other archive centres as appropriate - UKHO (bathymetry), Royal Commission Ancient and Historic Monuments Wales (geophysics), Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (geophysics and diving/ROV), Archaeology Data Service (diving/ROV). Although generated for archaeological purposes, these high quality and resolution data are capable of re-use by marine surveyors and scientists from a range of different fields. Data are delivered via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm and additional data are available on request enquiries@bgs.ac.uk.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    The Marine Hard Substrate dataset maps areas of rock or hard substrate outcropping or within 0.5m of the sea-bed. The interpretation was based on a variety of data sourced from within the British Geological Survey and externally. Data consulted includes archive sample and seismic records, side scan sonar, multibeam bathymetry and Olex datasets. The distribution of hard substrate at the seabed, or within 0.5 m is important in dictating the benthic assemblages found in certain areas. Therefore, an understanding of the distribution of these substrates is of primary importance in marine planning and designation of Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs) under the Marine and Coastal Access Act, 2009. In addition, a number of other users will value these data, including marine renewable companies, aggregate companies, the fishing and oil and gas industries. In order to address this issue it was necessary to update British Geological Survey sea-bed mapping to delineate areas where rock, boulders or cobbles are present at, or within 0.5m of the sea-bed surface. A polygon shape file showing areas of rock or hard substrate at, or within 0.5m of the sea-bed has been developed. The dataset has been created as vector polygons and are available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs.

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    THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN **This dataset was created for the "Britain beneath our feet" atlas using information extracted from the Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) For The UK . For Arsenic in soil data please see Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) For The UK ** Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) coverage for arsenic in soil. The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and, locally, soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. The average sample density for stream sediments and water is about one site per 1.5-2km square. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared. Published in Britain beneath our feet atlas.