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    The British Geological Survey hold a collection of data recorded during marine geophysical surveys which includes digital data and analogue records. These data result from approximately 350,000 line kilometres of multi-instrument geophysical survey lines. The data include seismic, sonar, magnetic, gravity, echo sounder, multibeam bathymetry and navigation data. The seismic data are mainly for airgun, sparker, boomer and pinger. The data were primarily collected by BGS and the collection also includes additional third party data. The data are primarily from the UKCS (United Kingdom Continental Shelf). The data are stored within the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. The majority of legacy geophysical paper records are available as scanned images viewable via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm. Other records can be scanned on request. Older records are of variable quality. Data not yet available online including segy are available on request enquiries@bgs.ac.uk. The data are applicable to a wide range of uses including environmental, geotechnical, geophysical and geological studies. Reference: Fannin, NGT. (1989) Offshore Investigations 1966-87. British Geological Survey Technical Report WB/89/2, British Geological Survey.

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    The British Geological Survey has collected over 50000 offshore samples using grabs, dredges and shallow coring devices (to a maximum depth of 6m below the sea bed). The collection also includes additional third party data and has assisted in the creation of BGS Marine Geology Maps. The distribution is variable, but in general there are sample stations spaced about every 5 - 10km across the entire UK Continental Shelf (UKCS). In some localised areas the sampling density is much higher. The data held includes digital data and analogue records (sample data sheets), plus associated physical sample material. Sample data sheets which have been scanned contain index information and geological descriptions and are more detailed from 1983 onwards. Coded geological descriptions were entered on sheets which were subsequently digitised, and this information is available for about 10,000 samples. The data also includes results of analyses such as micropalaeontological examination or age dating. Particle Size Analysis, geochemistry and geotechnical data are described in separate metadata entries. Sample material are managed as part of the BGS Materials collection and are available for examination and subsampling. The data are stored within the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. Data are delivered via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm.The activity and scan layers contains location information, metadata and links to scanned sample datasheets/core logs, and the geological, geotechnical, geochemical and sea-bed sediment data layers contain observations and/or measurements as digital values. The data are applicable to a wide range of uses including environmental, geotechnical and geological studies. Reference: Fannin, NGT. (1989) Offshore Investigations 1966-87. British Geological Survey Technical Report WB/89/2, British Geological Survey.

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    The BGS Seabed Sediments 250k dataset is vector data is vector data which reflects the distribution of seabed substrate types of the UK and some of its adjacent waters at 1:250,000 scale. This comprehensive product provides a digital compilation of the paper maps published by BGS at the same scale, as well as, additional re-interpretations from regional geological studies. The seabed is commonly covered by sediments that form a veneer or thicker superficial layer of unconsolidated material above the bedrock. These sediments are classified based on their grain size reflecting the environment in which were deposited. This information is important to a range of stakeholders, including marine habitat mappers, marine spatial planners, offshore industries (in particular, the dredging and aggregate industries). This dataset was primarily based on seabed grab samples of the top 0.1 m, combined with cores, dredge samples and sidescan sonar acquired during mapping surveys since the early 1970s. The variations in data density will be reflected in the detail of the mapping.

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    This mineral resource data was produced as part of the Mineral Resource Map of Northern Ireland via a commission from the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment. The work resulted in a series of 21 data layers which were used to generate a series of six digitally generated maps. This work was completed in 2012 with one map for each of the six counties (including county boroughs) of Northern Ireland at a scale of 1:100 000. This data and the accompanying maps are intended to assist strategic decision making in respect of mineral extraction and the protection of important mineral resources against sterilisation. They bring together a wide range of information, much of which is scattered and not always available in a convenient form. The data has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland and was funded via a commission from the Northern Ireland Department of the Environment. These layers display the spatial data of the mineral resources of Northern Ireland. There are a series of layers which consist of: Bedrock: Clay, Coal & Lignite, Coal – lignite proven, Conglomerate, Dolomite, Igneous and meta-igneous rock, Limestone, a 100m buffer layer on the Ulster White Limestone, Meta-sedimentary rocks, Perlite, Salt, sandstone and Silica Sand. Superficial (unconsolidated recent sediments) : Sand & gravel and Peat. The data except for the salt and proven lignite resource layers was derived from the 1:50 00 and 1:250 000 scale DigMap NI dataset. A user guide 'The Mineral Resources of Northern Ireland digital dataset (version 1)' OR/12/039 describing the creation and use of the data is available. A companion set of data with the internal boundaries retained is also available.

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    The data set consists of the results of particle size analysis (PSA) performed on approximetaly 29,000 sea-bed sediment samples collected by BGS from the UK Continental Shelf and adjacent deep water areas, mostly using sediment grabs, but also sediment corers on occasions. Measurements were also made on approximately 8000 downhole sub-samples from shallow cores and boreholes. Data from other UK organisations have also been added to the PSA dataset. The data are stored as part of the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. Data are delivered via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm Seabed Sediment Data layers.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS Lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    Linear features (shown as polylines) represent six classes of geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. However landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. The linear features are organised into seven main categories: Alteration area indicating zones of change to the pre-existing rocks due to the application of heat and pressure that can occur round structural features such as faults and dykes. Fault where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by a large scale process affecting the earth's crust. Fold where strata are bent or deformed resulting from changes or movement of the earth's surface creating heat and pressure to reshape and transform the original horizontal strata. Folds appear on all scales, in all rock types and from a variety of causes. Fossil horizons where prolific fossil assemblages occur and can be used to help establish the order in which deposits were laid down (stratigraphy). These horizons allow correlation where sediments of the same age look completely different due to variations in depositional environment. Mineral vein where concentrations of crystallised mineral occur within a rock, they are closely associated with faulting, but may occur independently. Landforms define the landscape by its surface form; these include glacial features such as drumlins, eskers and ice margins. Rock identifies key (marker) beds, recognised as showing distinct physical characteristics or fossil content. Examples include coal seams, gypsum beds and marine bands. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    BGS has drilled almost 600 boreholes to prove seismic interpretations of the marine Quaternary geology and bedrock from the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS). The collection also includes additional third party data and has assisted in the creation of BGS Marine Geology Maps. The boreholes penetrate beneath the sea bed to depths ranging from about 10m to over 300m depending on the target depth or technical problems associated with drilling the borehole. The data includes descriptive geological core logs and data which has been captured from these and in some cases natural gamma logs. A variety of analyses has been conducted on the core material such as Particle Size Analysis, micropalaeontological, geotechnical, palaeomagnetic and age dating. Core material are managed as part of the BGS Materials collection and are available for examination and subsampling. The data are stored as part of the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. Data are delivered via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex http://www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm. The activity and scan layers contains location information, metadata and links to scanned borehole logs, and the geological data layers contain observations and/or measurements as digital values. The data are applicable to a wide range of uses including environmental, geotechnical and geological studies. Reference: Fannin, NGT. (1989) Offshore Investigations 1966-87 British Geological Survey Technical Report WB/89/02, British Geological Survey.

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    The BGS 3D scans store holds digital 3-dimensional scans of BGS palaeontological and petrological specimens. The data include 3-dimensional meshes and 2-dimensional images exported by the scanning hardware and software. Data are stored in software-independent 3D modelling formats such as .OBJ and .PLY. These scans are useful for research purposes, for example allowing members of the broader geoscience community to interactively view a particular specimen, and for publicising BGS specimen holdings.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:625 000 scale providing a simplified interpretation of the geology and may be used as a guide at a regional or national level, but should not be relied on for local geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland. The Dykes data defines small, narrow areas (shown as polygons) of a specific type of bedrock geology, igneous rocks which have been intruded into the landscape. The dykes are presented as an optional, separate theme in order to provide additional clarity of the Bedrock theme. The bedrock and dykes datasets are designed to be used together. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are delivered free of charge under the terms of the Open Government Licence.