Type
 

nonGeographicDataset

665 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
From 1 - 10 / 665
  • Categories  

    It is now generally accepted that anthropogenic CO2 emissions are contributing to the global rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. One possibility for reducing carbon dioxide emissions is to remove it from the flue gases of coal-fired power stations and dispose of it in underground geological reservoirs, possibly offshore in the North Sea. The feasibility of this option has been studied in detail by a consortium of European partners. As part of this study, natural occurrences of carbon dioxide were identified and preliminary information from these was obtained. The best characterised are found in the United States where the carbon dioxide reserves are exploited for use in tertiary enhanced oil recovery (EOR) programs in the Texas oilfields. The carbon dioxide reserves occur in geological structures and lithologies which are similar to those present in the North Sea. As such, these fields offer an ideal natural analogue for the disposal of carbon dioxide, since the interactions with groundwaters and reservoir lithologies have occurred on both spatial and temporal scales relevant to geological processes. Those carbon dioxide fields currently being exploited have already been studied to a limited extent by the oil companies involved. However, further study is required to provide information on the potential effects that disposing of large quantities of carbon dioxide might have on groundwaters and reservoir quality. In addition, more detailed information will be obtained on the interactions which occur during EOR using carbon dioxide. This paper presents data on some of the natural carbon dioxide fields, and compares the effects of these natural fluid-rock interactions with those observed in laboratory experiments performed to establish what reactions occur during the geological disposal of carbon dioxide. doi:10.1016/0196-8904(95)00309-6. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0196890495003096.

  • Categories  

    The purpose of Joule II Project Number CT92-0031 'The Underground Disposal of Carbon Dioxide' was to examine the potential for reducing CO2 emissions to the Earth's atmosphere from fossil fuel fired power plant by disposing of this CO2 underground. The report discusses whether this could be done practically, safely and economically, with minimal long term effects on man or the global environment. The report concentrates on the CO2 disposal process but also includes a detailed study of the technical and economic optimisation of CO2-removal in a lignite-fired IGCC power plant. The report is available for download at http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/502763/.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Tractable equations of state for CO2 mixtures in CCS was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-22. A potential bottle-neck for CCS is the transport of CO2 from power plants to the storage location, by pipeline. Key to safe and inexpensive transport is a detailed understanding of the physical properties of carbon dioxide. However, no gas separation process is 100% efficient, and the resulting carbon dioxide contains a number of different impurities. These impurities can greatly influence the physical properties of the fluid compared to pure CO2. They have important design, safety and cost implications for the compression and transport of carbon dioxide. This project aimed to develop new methods to produce custom models (equations of state) for impure CO2 behaviour for CCS.

  • Categories  

    Final SACS 1 Report - Saline Aquifer CO2 Storage : a demonstration project at the Sleipner Field. Work area 1 (geology). The report can be downloaded from http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/512807/.

  • Categories  

    The underground disposal of industrial quantities of CO2 is entirely feasible. Cost is the main barrier to implementation. The preferred concept is disposal into porous and permeable reservoirs capped by a low permeability seal, ideally, but not necessarily, at depths of around 800 metres or more, where the CO2 will be in a dense phase. New concepts and refined reservoir models are continually emerging. As more regional estimates are carried out it appears that there will be ample underground storage capacity in the worlds sedimentary basins. Storage will be stable over geological timescales. The (remote) possibility of an escape of CO2 from a storage reservoir onshore merits further investigation and modelling. It would be highly desirable to learn as much as possible from the operators of the new CO2 disposal schemes arising from natural gas processing in offshore gas fields, as few such opportunities may arise. doi:10.1016/S0196-8904(96)00268-3. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196890496002683

  • Categories  

    The IEA (International Energy Agency) Weyburn Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Monitoring and Storage Project has analysed the effects of a miscible CO2 flood into a carbonate reservoir rock at an onshore Canadian oilfield. Anthropogenic CO2 is being injected as part of an enhanced oil recovery operation. The European research was aimed at analysing longterm migration pathways of CO2 and the effects of CO2 on the hydrochemical and mineralogical properties of the reservoir rock.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Determination of water solubility limits in CO2 mixtures to deliver water specification levels for CO2 transportation was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-21. Studies of the phase behaviour and water solubility of pure and impure CO2 are of great relevance to the transport phase of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) process. For transport through carbon steel pipelines, CO2 and any impurities present must be present as a single phase to avoid corrosion, and subsequent loss of pipeline integrity. Trace impurities such as H2 and N2 have been shown to alter the phase behaviour of the CO2 at high pressure. Understanding the effect of these impurities on the solubility of H2O in CO2 is vital to confirm the safety and viability of CO2 transport through carbon steel pipelines.

  • Categories  

    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Multiscale characterization of CO2 storage in the United Kingdom, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-197.

  • Categories  

    This presentation on the EPSRC project, DiSECCS, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 8.04.13. Grant number: Grant number: EP/K035878/1.

  • Categories  

    Technical report, component of ‘Progressing Scotland’s CO2 storage opportunities’ 2010. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage is a very active field of research, especially for the past decade. From the UK perspective, a commercially crucial aspect is the saline aquifer research, since there are predicted to be vast storage capacities in the sedimentary formations of the North Sea. The report reviews the ongoing work on practical injections of CO2 as research tests for storage projects and specifically focuses on industrial sized saline aquifer injections. Available for download at http://hdl.handle.net/1842/15681.