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    Sometimes known as the "One-Inch Collection", this is an archival collection of rock samples collected by BGS field staff during surveys within England and Wales, arranged by 1-inch (or 50 K) scale BGS geological map sheet area. It was intended as a representative suite of the lithologies present in each sheet, although this was only partially achieved. Documentation is via archive of rock sample collection sheets (see COLLECTIONSHEETS) but is poorly coordinated at present.

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    Old card index of quarries in England, Wales and Scotland dating mostly from 1939 to 1963: about 7000 cards, each referring to one quarry. England & Wales cards are arranged by BGS 1-inch (now 50k scale) geological sheet, Scottish cards by county. At best, cards indicate county, geol-sheet, rock type, name, grid reference, locality, owner, date of record and cross references to BGS samples.

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    The Seismic Locations and Sections database (LOCSEC) stores digitised seismic reflection survey location and line-interpretation data. Supplementary data stored includes map projection information and rock-unit seismic velocity data. The data are grouped by interpretation project area. Location data are input from digitised seismic shotpoint (SP) or common depth point (CDP) maps, or from direct input of digital navigation data. [See: Original Seismic Shotpoint Location Maps (ORIGSPMAPS) and Digital Seismic Shotpoint Location Maps (DIGSPMAPS) datasets]. Line-interpretation data are input from digitised pick-lines on manually interpreted printed seismic sections. [See: Copy Seismic Sections dataset (COPYSEISECS)]. In-house software is used for data management and display, to perform interpretation related tasks, e.g. depth-conversion, and to merge data into X, Y, Z form for input to 3D mapping and modelling packages such as EarthVision. Data in LOCSEC may also be related to the borehole interpretations held in the Stratigraphic Surfaces Database (SSD). Almost all data are within the UK Onshore area; although there are some UK near-shore and offshore (North Sea, Irish Sea) and foreign data. Most data were acquired for commercial hydrocarbon exploration and subsequently provided to BGS for use on specific projects. Some data were acquired by BGS and other public-sector bodies, e.g. BIRPS, for academic research.

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    The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. The average sample density for stream sediments and water is about one site per 1.5-2km square, and for soils one site per 2km square. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared. Analytical data for the 150 microns fraction of soil and stream sediment samples are available for some or all of: Ag, As, B, Ba, Bi, Be, Ca, Ce, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, Ti, U, V, Y, Zn, and Zr. Most water samples have been analysed for alkalinity, pH, conductivity, F and U and some for multi-element analyses including Al, Cl, Na, Si, SO4,NO4, and TOC. The project now routinely determines the elements listed in the <2mm fraction of surface soils.

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    The data comprises a GIS layers representing the permeability of Superficial geological deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale, 1:625:000, is used. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

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    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. GeoSure Basic is a single, combined GeoSure model, containing only the highest score of all the GeoSure layers. The model has been re-classified to negligible - very low, low and moderate - high. The methodology is based on the 6 GeoSure individual hazard Assessments. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

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    A superficial thickness model covering England Scotland and Wales. The model is derived by direct modelling (natural neighbour interpolation) of BGS Borehole records and BGS Digmap. For the purposes of modelling, superficial deposits include sediments deposited during the Quaternary, subsequent Holocene rivers and coastal systems and also modern anthropogenic material. i.e. deposits that are less than 2.6 million years old. Grids are overprinted with a minimum value so that areas where no bore data is present, but superficial deposits are known to occur are given a minimum 1.5m thickness. The superficial thickness model has been created as baseline datasets for the BGS Information Products programme. The model provides only a simple, mathematical interpretation of reality with some phantom points that improve the model mainly in valley areas where lack of data was given different results as those expected by a geological interpretation of the area. The complexity of Superficial deposits in Great Britain is such that it is only possible to model indicative values of thickness and elevation. The models should never be used as a substitute for thorough site investigation.

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    The National Soil Parent Material dataset is a GIS describing the geological material from which topsoils and subsoils (A and B horizons) develop (i.e. from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core geological characteristics relating to their lithologies. The dataset covers England, Scotland and Wales and characterises parent material lithology, texture, mineralogy, strength and a range of other soil/parent related properties.

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    Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. The joint Public Health England (PHE) –British Geological Survey (BGS) digital Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. PHE (formerly the Health Protection Agency (HPA)) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average is at or above 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3). This is termed the Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. The Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain presents a simplified version of the radon potential for Great Britain with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The joint PHE-BGS digital radon potential for Great Britain provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Great Britain. The Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain is published in two documents. The area of England and Wales is published in MILES J.C.H, APPLETON J.D, REES D.M, GREEN B.M.R, ADLAM K.A.M and MYERS, A.H., 2007. Indicative Atlas of Radon in England and Wales. ISBN: 978-0-85951-608-2. 29 pp). The corresponding publication for Scotland is MILES J.C.H, APPLETON J.D, REES D.M, ADLAM K.A.M, GREEN B.M.R, and SCHEIB, C., 2011. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Scotland.).

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    1:50,000 maps showing the main geological superficial divisions in Northern Ireland. This series shows the superficial (drift) geology of Northern Ireland at 1:50,000 scale. For each rock unit there is a brief generalised description under the following headings. LEX_D: Description of the selected polygon. LEX_RCS: Map code as it appears on the published 1:250,000 map. RCS_D: Decription of the deposit. VERSION: Version of the data. RELEASED: Date of release/update of the data. Persons interested in the detailed geology of particular sites should consult the latest large-scale maps or the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland at:- Geological Survey of Northern Ireland Colby House Stranmillis Court Belfast BT9 5BF