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    The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings. This data is available as vector data, 25m gridded data or alternatively linked to a postcode database – the Derived Postcode Database. A series of GIS (Geographical Information System) maps show the most significant hazard areas. The ground movement, or subsidence, hazards included are landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product uses the individual GeoSure data layers and evaluates them using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The Derived Postcode Database (DPD) contains generalised information at a postcode level. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. It is available as a GIS point dataset or a text (.txt) file format. The DPD contains a normalised hazard rating for each of the 6 GeoSure themes hazards (i.e. each GeoSure theme has been balanced against each other) and a combined unified hazard rating for each postcode in Great Britain. The combined hazard rating for each postcode is available as a standalone product. The Derived Postcode Database is available in a point data format or text file format. It is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset has been created as vector data but is also available as a raster grid. This data is available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo coverage’s and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution. This dataset has been specifically developed for the insurance of low-rise buildings. The GeoSure datasets have been developed to identify the potential hazard for low-rise buildings and those with shallow foundations of less than 2 m deep. The identification of ground instability and other geological hazards can assist regional planners; rapidly identifying areas with potential problems and aid local government offices in making development plans by helping to define land suited to different uses. Other users of these data may include developers, homeowners, solicitors, loss adjusters, the insurance industry, architects and surveyors. Version 7 released June 2015.

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    A 1:250,000 map showing the main geological bedrock divisions in Northern Ireland. The bedrock shown on GeoIndex map comprises the bedrock geology, which represents the outcrops (at surface) and subcrops (at near-surface, beneath superficial deposits) in Northern Ireland. For each rock unit there is a brief generalised description showing the major rock group, rock type and age under the following headings. LEX_D: The name of the selected area. This can be a group, formation or igneous intrusion e.g. dyke. LEX_RCS: Map code as it appears on the published 1:250,000 map. RCS_D: The name of the dominant types of rock (lithologies) in the different areas shown on the map e.g. granite. The names of the rock types given here are often generalisations, appropriate for the large areas of geological coverage at this scale. These areas may include a number of different geological formations whose distribution can only be portrayed on more detailed geological maps. RANK: Identifies formations and groups. Min_Time_D and Max_Tim_D: The age of the rock unit in terms of periods, relatively smaller units of geological time e.g. Carboniferous, Jurassic etc. Some of the map areas include rocks with a range of ages and these are shown as such e.g. Triassic to Cretaceous. The oldest metamorphic rocks are described as Moinian and Dalradian. The rocks range in age from those deposited relatively recently, some 2 million years ago, back to ancient and highly altered Precambrian rocks over 2500 million years old. In broad terms the youngest rocks are found in the south and east of the UK, the oldest in the north and west. VERSION: Version of the data. RELEASED: Date of release/update of the data. CAUTION Because of the generalisation and simplification used in the compilation of this map, it should not be used to determine the detailed geology of any specific sites. It is best used to provide a basic understanding of the geology of the country in general, and for showing the geology of large regions where broad trends are more important than specific details. Persons interested in the detailed geology of particular sites should consult the latest large-scale maps or the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland at:- Geological Survey of Northern Ireland Colby House Stranmillis Court Belfast BT9 5BF

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    The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. G-BASE for SW England is the most recent area of the UK sampled by this on-going project The average sample density for stream sediments is approximately one site per 2km square. Density for soils in SW England is variable across the area, ranging from 1 per 2km square to one per 5km square, depending on underlying parent material. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure continuity with existing G-BASE geochemical data. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared. Analytical data for the sub150 microns fraction of stream sediment and the sub 2mm fraction of soil samples are available for some or all of: Ag, Al, As, Ba, Bi, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hf, I, In, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Te, Th, Ti, Tl, U, V, W, Y, Yb, Zn, and Zr.

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    This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the susceptibility of corroded underground ferrous (iron) assets (e.g. pipes) to failure, as a result of ground instability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains eight fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where corroded ferrous assets may fail. The other seven fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to corrosivity and hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where underground ferrous assets are susceptible to failure as a result of ground conditions.

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    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to show running sand behaviour under the action of flowing water, a characteristic usually of saturated sand and silt grade material. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

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    The Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry England and Wales dataset indicates the estimated geometric mean topsoil Arsenic(As), Cadmium (Cd), Cr (Chromium), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) concentrations (mg kg-1). The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) soil geochemical data where these are available. Elsewhere the stream sediment data are converted to surface soil equivalent potentially harmful element (PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers England and Wales but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

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    The BGS groundwater levels dataset is a gridded interpolation of depth to groundwater. The dataset is a raster grid, with 50 × 50 metre pixels holding values that represent the probable maximum depth, in metres, to the phreatic water table. This represents the likely lowest water level, under natural conditions, in an open well or borehole drilled into the uppermost parts of a rock unit. The dataset has been modelled from topography and hydrology, assuming that surface water and groundwater are hydraulically connected. It has not used observations of groundwater level in wells or boreholes directly, but they have been used to validate its performance.

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    **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1** The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings. This data is available as vector data, 25m gridded data or alternatively linked to a postcode database - the Derived Postcode Database. A series of GIS (Geographical Information System) maps show the most significant hazard areas. The ground movement, or subsidence, hazards included are landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product uses the individual GeoSure data layers and evaluates them using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The Derived Postcode Database (DPD) contains generalised information at a postcode level. The DPD is designed to provide a 'summary' value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. It is available as a GIS point dataset or a text (.txt) file format. The DPD contains a normalised hazard rating for each of the 6 GeoSure themes hazards (i.e. each GeoSure theme has been balanced against each other) and a combined unified hazard rating for each postcode in Great Britain. The combined hazard rating for each postcode is available as a standalone product. The Derived Postcode Database is available in a point data format or text file format. It is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset has been created as vector data but is also available as a raster grid. This data is available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo coverage's and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50m ground resolution. This dataset has been specifically developed for the insurance of low-rise buildings. The GeoSure datasets have been developed to identify the potential hazard for low-rise buildings and those with shallow foundations of less than 2 m deep. The identification of ground instability and other geological hazards can assist regional planners; rapidly identifying areas with potential problems and aid local government offices in making development plans by helping to define land suited to different uses. Other users of these data may include developers, homeowners, solicitors, loss adjusters, the insurance industry, architects and surveyors.

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    Joint BGS/Environment Agency dataset of aquifer designations for England and Wales at 1:50 000. The dataset identifies different types of aquifer - underground layers of water-bearing permeable rock or drift deposits from which groundwater can be extracted. These designations reflect the importance of aquifers in terms of groundwater as a resource (drinking water supply) but also their role in supporting surface water flows and wetland ecosystems. The maps are split into two different type of aquifer designation: superficial - permeable unconsolidated (loose) deposits (for example, sands and gravels), and bedrock - solid permeable formations e.g. sandstone, chalk and limestone.

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    The National Soil Parent Material dataset is a GIS describing the geological material from which topsoils and subsoils (A and B horizons) develop (i.e. from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core geological characteristics relating to their lithologies. The dataset covers England, Scotland and Wales and characterises parent material lithology, texture, mineralogy, strength and a range of other soil/parent related properties.