denominator

50000

76 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
From 1 - 10 / 76
  • Categories  

    The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings. This data is available as vector data, 25m gridded data or alternatively linked to a postcode database – the Derived Postcode Database. A series of GIS (Geographical Information System) maps show the most significant hazard areas. The ground movement, or subsidence, hazards included are landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product uses the individual GeoSure data layers and evaluates them using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The Derived Postcode Database (DPD) contains generalised information at a postcode level. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. It is available as a GIS point dataset or a text (.txt) file format. The DPD contains a normalised hazard rating for each of the 6 GeoSure themes hazards (i.e. each GeoSure theme has been balanced against each other) and a combined unified hazard rating for each postcode in Great Britain. The combined hazard rating for each postcode is available as a standalone product. The Derived Postcode Database is available in a point data format or text file format. It is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset has been created as vector data but is also available as a raster grid. This data is available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo coverage’s and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution. This dataset has been specifically developed for the insurance of low-rise buildings. The GeoSure datasets have been developed to identify the potential hazard for low-rise buildings and those with shallow foundations of less than 2 m deep. The identification of ground instability and other geological hazards can assist regional planners; rapidly identifying areas with potential problems and aid local government offices in making development plans by helping to define land suited to different uses. Other users of these data may include developers, homeowners, solicitors, loss adjusters, the insurance industry, architects and surveyors. Version 7 released June 2015.

  • Categories  

    This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the potential for leakage to have a negative effect on ground stability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains seven fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where leakage may affect ground stability. The other six fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to the extent to which hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands will be increased due to leakage. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where. and to what extent, leaking underground pipes or other structures may initate or worsen ground stability.

  • Categories  

    An important paper archive of a wide variety of miscellaneous geological information organised on the basis of its location within 1:50 000 scale geological map sheet areas in Great Britain. The majority of the data has been produced or collected by BGS staff since 1835 as part of the mapping programme. The data may not fit into any of the main collections, but is valuable for future projects and answering enquiries.

  • Categories  

    The Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) commissioned a series of Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) surveys via the Marine Environment Protection Fund (MEPF) to develop understanding of submerged habitats and heritage in Britain. The aim was to acquire high quality data to enable broad scale characterisation of the seabed habitats, their biological communities and potential historic environment assets. The surveys were conducted in the following areas - Outer Bristol Chanel (2003 – 2005), Eastern English Channel (2005 – 2006), South Coast (2007 - 2010), Outer Thames (2007), East Coast (2008 - 2009), Humber (2008 - 2009). The Geology and Geophysics component of the data are archived by British Geological Survey (BGS) in the Marine Environmental data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. The data includes bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sub-bottom profiler, magnetometer, seabed video and photographs, Particle Size Analysis (PSA) data, vibrocore (logs and images). Data are delivered via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm. Additional data are available on request enquiries@bgs.ac.uk. Other data types have been archived with the other MEDIN DACs as appropriate (UKHO DAC for bathymetry data and DASSH DAC for biological data). The MALSF ceased operation at the end of March 2011 (http://www.marinealsf.org.uk/).

  • Categories  

    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS Lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Categories  

    This national dataset brings together sixteen national datasets to create a GIS product that provides the information necessary to determine the extent to which the ground is suitable for infiltration sustainable drainage systems (SuDS). It includes derivations of the following datasets: soluble rocks, landslide hazards, groundwater flooding susceptibility, made ground, shallow mining hazards, geological indicators of flooding, depth to water table, superficial thickness, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays, running sands, predominant flow mechanism, permeability indices and the Environment Agencys source protection zone dataset. All datasets have been reclassified and reattributed (with text descriptions and a score field indicating the suitability of the ground for infiltration) and feature in the end product both as single entities, but also in derived 'screening' maps that combine numerous datasets.

  • Categories  

    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as five themes: bedrock, superficial deposits, mass movement, artificial ground and linear features. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However this data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. Artificial (man-made) theme (shown as polygons) indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the constantly changing nature of land use and re-use/redevelopment, caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. Linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. Landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. All five data themes are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Categories  

    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The Insurance Data give an index level assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to create financial insurance loss. The methodology is based on the 6 GeoSure individual hazard assessments. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • Categories  

    Two geochemical surveys were undertaken in the Solomon Islands between 1976 and 1983 as part of a combined geological mapping and mineral exploration project. The survey of Choiseul and the Shortland Islands was carried out between 1976 and 1979 by the Institute of Geological Sciences (now the British Geological Survey) with support from staff of the Geology Division of the Ministry of Land, Energy and Natural Resources, Solomon Islands. The project produced 12 geological maps at 1:50,000 scale as well as a series of unpublished reports. The survey of the New Georgia Group of islands was undertaken between 1979 and 1983. The project produced 7 geological maps at a scale of 1:100,000 and a regional map of the entire island group at a scale of 1:250,000. A series of multielement geochemical anomaly maps were produced at a scale of 1:100,000 to accompany each of the published geological maps. Master copies of these are held at the Geological Survey in Honiara. Full descriptions of the methods used are described in the margins of the anomaly maps. A total of 8848 stream sediment samples were collected from Choiseul and 7441 from the New Georgia Group, resulting in an average sampling density for the two areas of 2.68 samples per km2 and 1.47 samples per km2 respectively. Sampling in the Shortland Islands was confined to the larger islands, 187 were collected from the Fauro Island group, 148 from Alu and 69 from Mono. The samples were dry sieved and the fraction passing -80 mesh B.S. (177 microns) was analysed. A hot concentrated nitric acid digestion was used prior to analysis by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry (AAS) for Co, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Mn. Samples from the vicinity of the Siruka Ultramafic Complex were determined for Cr by AAS after digestion by a bisulphate fusion technique. Raw data can be obtained from the Geology Division, Ministry of Mines and Energy, PO Box G37, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

  • Categories  

    The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. G-BASE for SW England is the most recent area of the UK sampled by this on-going project The average sample density for stream sediments is approximately one site per 2km square. Density for soils in SW England is variable across the area, ranging from 1 per 2km square to one per 5km square, depending on underlying parent material. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure continuity with existing G-BASE geochemical data. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared. Analytical data for the sub150 microns fraction of stream sediment and the sub 2mm fraction of soil samples are available for some or all of: Ag, Al, As, Ba, Bi, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hf, I, In, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Te, Th, Ti, Tl, U, V, W, Y, Yb, Zn, and Zr.