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    UKGEOS and Core Sample Analysis. Geomechanical testing was performed to determine triaxial compressional strength, tensile strength, frictional strength and permeability of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals from eleven depth intervals within the GGC01 borehole, UK Geoenergy Observatories (UKGEOS), Glasgow, United Kingdom. Frictional strength tests were also performed on cuttings samples of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals from the GGA08 borehole, Glasgow, United Kingdom. In total twenty-three tensile strength tests were performed on ten sampled intervals, and seven porosity measurements pre-and post-failure were taken. Nine triaxial compressive strength tests and twenty-one frictional strength tests were performed, with permeability measured both before and after failure or shear respectively. From compressive strength tests we also determined the Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. Results of X-Ray Diffraction are also included in the dataset.

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    Contains 6 SCCS technical briefings, technical letters and technical journal responses - Working Paper 2010-04: Popular response to Economides, CO2 storage is feasible; Working Paper 2010-05: Formal response to Economides, CO2 storage is feasible; Working Paper 2010-07: Comment on Little and Jackson: Potential Impacts of Leakage from Deep CO2 Geosequestration on Overlying Freshwater Aquifers; Working Paper 2012-01: Comment by Stuart Haszeldine on Zoback and Gorelick; Working Paper 2014-01: Sleipner CO2 securely stored deep beneath seabed, in spite of unexpected Hugin fracture discovery; Working Paper 2015-02: Carbon Dioxide Transport Plans for Carbon Capture and Storage in the North Sea Region - A summary of existing studies and proposals applicable to the development of Projects of Common Interest.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project The Development and Demonstration of Best Practice Guidelines for the Safe Start-up Injection of CO2 into Depleted Gas Fields was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-183. Highly-depleted gas fields represent prime potential targets for large-scale storage of captured CO2 emitted from industrial sources and fossil-fuel power plants. Given the potentially low reservoir pressures as well as the unique thermodynamic properties of CO2, especially in the presence of the various stream impurities, the injection process presents significant safety and operational challenges. In particular, the start-up injection leads to the following risks: • blockage due to hydrate and ice formation following the contact of the cold CO2 with the interstitial water around the wellbore; • thermal stress shocking of the wellbore casing steel, leading to its fracture and ultimately escape of CO2; • over-pressurisation accompanied by CO2 backflow into the injection system due to the violent evaporation of the superheated liquid CO2 upon entry into the wellbore.

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    The data consists of a poster presented at the UKCCSRC biannual meeting in Cardiff, September 10-11th 2014. The poster describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. Shallow gas accumulations in the Netherlands sector of the Southern North Sea provide an opportunity to study their coincidence with faulting. Although difficult to attribute the occurrence of shallow gas to leakage of thermogenic fluids from depth (indeed shallow-sourced biogenic gas is common in the North Sea), evidence suggests a relationship, and the common attributes of the faults provide indications of the conditions under which faults in the region may leak, providing a useful indications of factors that should be avoided during CO2 storage operations.

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    This data contains the output from the first Flexible CCS Network Development (FleCCSnet) workshop of stakeholders discussing the development of CO2 networks in the UK. The first was held on the 30 April 2014 at the University of Edinburgh, UK. The purpose of Workshop 1 was to identify and confirm the key questions to be considered in order to understand the most likely impacts of variability in the CO2 sources and variability in CO2 sinks on CO2 transport system design and operation. There were a total of 21 attendees including 7 representatives from PSE, Scottish Power, BP, SCCS, Parsons Brinckerhoff, Element Energy, and AMEC. The dataset consists of two reports. The first report, 'Developing CO2 networks: Key lessons learnt from the first Flexible CCS Network Development (FleCCSnet) project workshop', summarises the workshop findings, which have been used to create a series of scenarios that were investigated by transient simulation. The scenarios developed are described in the second report, 'Developing CO2 networks: Scenarios building on the first Flexible CCS Network Development (FleCCSnet) project workshop'.

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    The data consists of an extended abstract submitted to 'The Fourth International Conference on Fault and Top Seals', Almeria, Spain, 20-24th September 2015. The abstract describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The CO2-rich St. Johns Dome reservoir in Arizona provides a useful analogue for leaking CO2 storage sites, and the abstract describes an analysis of the fault-seal behaviour at the site. http://earthdoc.eage.org/publication/publicationdetails/?publication=82673.

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    The objective of the EU SiteChar Project was to facilitate the implementation of CO2 geological storage in Europe by developing a methodology for the assessment of potential storage sites and the preparation of storage permit applications. Research was conducted through a strong collaboration of experienced industrial and academic research partners aiming to advance a portfolio of sites to a (near-) completed feasibility stage, ready for detailed front-end engineering and design and produce practical guidelines for site characterisation. SiteChar was a 3 year project supported by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme. The Final Report can be downloaded from http://cordis.europa.eu/docs/results/256/256705/final1-sitechar-finalreport.pdf.

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    Posters and presentations from the UKCCSRC Call 1 Project: Mixed matrix membranes for post combustion carbon capture (Mar 2013 to Dec 2015). Membrane processes are a promising alternative to the more classical post-combustion capture technologies due to the reduced maintenance of the process, the absence of dangerous solvents and their smaller footprint. This project aims at supporting the development of new mixed matrix membranes for post-combustion applications. Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) are composite materials formed by embedding inorganic fillers into a polymeric matrix in order to overcome the upper bound and combine the characteristics of the two solid phases: mechanical properties, economical processing capabilities and permeability of the polymer and selectivity of the filler. Despite several studies on the concept, the interactions between the two phases and their effect on the transport properties are not well understood. Yet, this fundamental knowledge is crucial in order to design the reliable materials needed for real-world-applications.

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    EPSRC project EP/K035878/1 - DiSECCS research has focussed on developing advanced seismic monitoring tools and combining these with social science research to identify key factors in establishing trust and confidence in the storage system.This report presents insights into and recommendations for the monitoring systems and protocols required to maintain the integrity of storage reservoirs suitable for large-scale CO2 storage and for obtaining a social licence to operate a CCS project.

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    This report presents a set of pragmatic and workable generic procedures, suggested best practices and other recommendations and observations for the safe and sustainable closure of geological CO2 storage sites. These have been distilled from the results of the CO2CARE project and represent the most important messages that will be of benefit to Regulators, storage site Operators and other stakeholders. The report can be downloaded from http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/512805/