cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notPlanned

1678 record(s)
 
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    The database contains basic tabulated field data resulting from the work of the BGS East Grampians Project in the early 1980s to mid 1990s. Records include the locations of stations at which field observations were made, structural measurements and sample locations. To this end, the database provides an index to locations and structural data. However, it needs to be stated clearly that labels given to structural elements are largely subjective beyond the identification of bedding. This means that the structural data are largely unusable without a clear understanding of their context and with regard to the primary paper record on which descriptions of the observed structures are recorded. The data are held in MS ACCESS tables which are related via the Station number as the primary key. The coverage is mainly confined to the North East Grampian Highlands of Scotland. The database is currently unused and has not been added to since the end of the East Grampians Project. The station location and structural data are effectively complete. However, fields in the sample database, such as the sample stratigraphy, are largely incomplete because, at the time the data were acquired, the stratigraphy at each station was formally undefined. The most effective way of presenting and investigating the data is via GIS.

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    This dataset is an archive of original data for the geophysical logging of boreholes drilled by the National Coal Board (NCB) and its successor, British Coal Corporation (BCC). Data coverage is UK wide and dates from the 1970's to the privatisation of the coal mining industry, in 1994. The dataset includes approximately 2000 field data recording tapes and processed data tapes. The processed data tapes are at various stages of processing and consist of edited data and computed (CSU) data (not available for all boreholes). The data are kept as archive copies. The data are owned by the Coal Authority (CA), as successor to the NCB and BCC, BGS being the custodian under an agreement with the Coal Authority. No full catalogue or index available yet.

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    The register lists Lower Palaeozoic microfaunas (including "small shelly" faunas), but occasionally mentions small trilobites and various fragments. SAQ1-259 are used, although several numbers have no details assigned to them. Sample number, sheet number, NGR, fossil identification, borehole names & depths are given.

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    The Samburu - Marsabit Geological Mapping and Mineral Exploration Project was a joint Kenyan and British technical co-operation project, carried out by staff of the Mines and Geological Department, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Kenya and staff from the British Geological Survey. The first phase of the project commenced in 1980, and covered the area between 36degrees and 38degrees E and from the equator to 2degrees N. The second phase, carried out between 1984 and 1986 covered the area between 36degrees and 38degrees E and from 2degrees N to the Ethiopian border. Sampling was carried out concurrently with geological mapping and was largely constrained by the requirements of that exercise. Little or no sampling was done in areas previously mapped by other bodies. Sampling was mainly confined to areas underlain by basement rocks of the Mozambique Belt and was very sparse over most of the Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic cover. Chemical analyses for the stream sediments were: Ag, Ba, Co, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn. Raw data is available from the Mines and Geological Survey Department, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Nairobi, Kenya. Sampling densities varied considerably across the Phase 1 project area, but generally a stream sediment sample density of one per 4 to 8 km2 and a panned concentrate density of one per 13 to 16 km2 was achieved. In the Phase 2 area, which was mainly very arid, a few samples were collected from dry stream beds, as part of a helicopter survey of the area, to provide some idea of the geochemistry of the major lithological units. Stream sediments were collected by combining grab samples from 5 to 10 points within a 10m radius of the selected site. If necessary the samples were dried before being sieved and the fine (-80 mesh B.S.) fraction retained for analysis. Heavy mineral concentrates were obtained by taking 2 to 5kg of material from the sample site and panning at the base camp, where water was available, or at the Mines and Geological Department headquarters at Nairobi.

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    A collection of reference drawings relating to investigations carried out by Nirex, during the period from 1989 to 1997. The drawings summarise the status of the geological investigation at Sellafield and include borehole locations, geology (surface, structure, sections etc) and geophysics (seismic, airborne, etc). Sites near Sellafield, in Cumbria, and Dounreay, in Caithness. The Nirex (Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive) geological archive was transferred to the British Geological Survey during 2000/2001. The BGS has undertaken to retain the records for a minimum of 50 years as part of its national geological archive. The ownership of Nirex was transferred from the nuclear industry to the UK Government departments DEFRA and DTI in April 2005, and then to the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in November 2006.

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    Digitised versions of a set of 1:100,000 scale maps of aquifer vulnerability for England and Wales. The dataset identifies the vulnerability to pollution of major and minor aquifers as defined by the Environment Agency, utilising a combination of geological, hydrogeological and soils data. The maps are designed to be used by planners, developers, consultants and regulatory bodies to ensure that developments conform to the Policy and Practice of the Environment Agency for the protection of Groundwater. Please note that these maps are based on data from the late 1980's and early 1990's, more up-to-date digital data may now be available from the Environment Agency. Flat maps may be purchased from the BGS, some sheets are now out of print.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    The dataset describes the relative vulnerability of groundwater to contamination across Scotland, by means of five relative classes ranging from 1 (lowest vulnerability) to 5 (highest vulnerability). The dataset is a screening tool that can be used to show the relative threat to groundwater quality from contamination across Scotland. It can provide guidance on the vulnerability of groundwater at a regional scale, highlighting areas at comparatively higher risk of groundwater contamination, and can help indicate the degree of specific site investigation required for a new development or activity. It is designed to be used at a scale of 1:100,000 and should be regarded as a tool to aid groundwater risk assessment rather than a complete solution. Latest version: Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland version 2

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    The British Geological Survey (BGS) was awarded a grant from the Welsh Assembly Government Aggregates Levy Fund in 2009 to provide a comprehensive, relevant and accessible information base to enhance the sustainability of mineral resources for Wales. BGS co-funded this project through its Sustainable Mineral Solutions project. This work was completed in 2010. This dataset comprises the digital GIS files which were produced through this project. The major elements of minerals information presented on the maps are; the geological distribution of all onshore mineral resources in Wales, the location of mineral extraction sites, the recorded occurrences of metallic minerals, the recorded location of former slate quarries and significant areas of slate waste and the recorded location of historic building stone quarries. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest. The data should not be used to determine individual planning applications or in taking decisions on the acquisition or use of a particular piece of land, although they may give useful background information which sets a specific proposal in context.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock geology of Great Britain is very diverse and includes three broad classes based on their mode of origin: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. The data includes attribution to identify each rock type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volumes 1-3 ). The bedrock has formed over long periods of geological time, from the Archean eon some 7500 million years ago, to the relatively young Pliocene, 58 million years ago. The age of the rocks is identified in the data through their BGS lexicon name (published for each deposit at the time of the original survey or subsequent digital data creation). For stratified rocks i.e. arranged in sequence, this will usually be of a lithostratigraphic type. Other rock types for example intrusive igneous bodies will be of a lithodemic type. More information on the formal naming of UK rocks is available in the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition, using visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.