cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notPlanned

207 record(s)
 
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    Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

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    The dataset consists of data for the UK for the Sustainable Development Goal 6.6.1: groundwater sub-indicator for the period 1990 to 2019. The dataset reports for the UK against Sub-Indicator 5 of Goal 6.6.1, following the recommended procedures in the UNEP report on monitoring methodologies for that sub-indicator. The sub-indicator is defined as the change in mean groundwater levels, averaged over a five-year period, from a mean in levels over a previous five-year reference period. Groundwater level data was obtained from BGS’ WellMaster database. 192 groundwater level monitoring stations were processed and, following quality control, 154 were used to provide estimates of regional variation in groundwater levels for 19 of the 34 HydroBASINS at Level 6 in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. As required by the guidance in the monitoring methodology, the sites chosen are representative of local and regional groundwater systems and are observation and monitoring boreholes where groundwater levels are not systematically affected by abstraction. All sites chosen have average monitoring frequencies of greater than one observation a month. The dataset is provided as a .csv file with the following headers: Column A: HYBAS_ID, HydroBASIN unique identification number. Column B: reference period (1990 to 1994). Columns C to AA: reporting periods (five-year periods starting in 1991) with data reported as percentage change (relative to reference period) in running mean five-year groundwater level by HydroBasin.

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    Scanned images of seismic phase data sheets containing phase readings, phase arrival times, amplitude data, magnitude data and derived source information like hypocentres (locations), fault plane solutions etc for earthquakes recorded by BGS seismic stations. The data is in the format used by the location program HYPO71 (Lee & Lahr, 1975) which was the most used program for local earthquakes.

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    Data identifies landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of artificial or man-made ground. It indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Limited coverage within Great Britain, data exists for 167 10x10km tiles. Most primary geological mapping was carried out at 1:10 000 scale but in some areas of Wales and Scotland mapping at 1:25 000 was adopted as the norm including areas with complex geology or in some areas of classic geology. Types of artificial ground include: Disturbed ground areas of ill-defined shallow or near surface mineral workings where distinction cannot be made between made and worked ground. Infilled ground areas where original geology has been removed and then wholly or partially back filled includes waste or landfill sites. Made ground man made features including embankments and spoil heaps. Worked ground areas where ground has been removed including quarries and road cuttings. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the shifting nature of land use and re-use caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence. Another batch of tiles was added to the data in 2012 to bring the total to 167 for this version 2 release.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Another batch of tiles was added to the data in 2012 to bring the total to 167 for this version 2 release. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; whilst mass movement events are recorded in the data due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data should therefore be regarded as a snapshot in time (as at 2008). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence. Another batch of tiles was added to the data in 2012 to bring the total to 167 for this version 2 release.

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    The borehole information pack from borehole GGA05, site 02 of the UK Geoenergy Observatories (UKGEOS) Glasgow facility. This release from the British Geological Survey (BGS) contains BGS and Drillers’ logs, cased hole and open hole wireline data, optical camera data, a listing of archived rock chips and a descriptive report. The mine water characterisation and monitoring borehole was drilled between 1st July and 11th October 2019 (start of drilling to casing installation date) to 88.5 m drilled depth. The cased borehole was wireline logged and hydrogeologically tested in January 2020. Rock chip samples were taken during the drilling process and have been archived at the National Geological Repository at BGS Keyworth. Further details can be found in the accompanying report http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/528052 DOI https://dx.doi.org/10.5285/714fe9fc-ce77-4479-8053-1c5fd4e86f06

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    Data identifies landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of artificial or man-made ground. It indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Types of artificial ground include: Disturbed ground areas of ill-defined shallow or near surface mineral workings where distinction cannot be made between made and worked ground. Infilled ground areas where original geology has been removed and then wholly or partially back filled includes waste or landfill sites. Landscaped ground areas where surface has been reshaped includes former sand and gravel workings for recreation and amenity use. Made ground man made features including embankments and spoil heaps. Worked ground areas where ground has been removed including quarries and road cuttings. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the shifting nature of land use and re-use caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of mass movement e.g. landslip. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    Data for Uganda includes analytical, field, isotope and borehole data. Data for Tanzania includes chemistry, field, isotope and borehole data. Borehole data from the Makutopora Wellfield is also included. This data was collected to investigate the resilience to climate change in sub-Saharan Africa (Tanzania and Uganda) of intensive groundwater abstraction from weathered crystalline rock aquifer systems. The sustainability of such abstractions was investigated by examining historical aquifer responses to climate and intensive (> 1 l/s) abstraction, and investigating groundwater residence times at sites of intensive groundwater abstraction using multiple tracers. The project was DFID funded. Project partners include: University College London, the British Geological Survey and the Overseas Development Institute

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    The British Geological Survey (BGS) was awarded a grant from the Welsh Assembly Government Aggregates Levy Fund in 2009 to provide a comprehensive, relevant and accessible information base to enhance the sustainability of mineral resources for Wales. BGS co-funded this project through its Sustainable Mineral Solutions project. This work was completed in 2010. This dataset comprises the digital GIS files which were produced through this project. The major elements of minerals information presented on the maps are; the geological distribution of all onshore mineral resources in Wales, the location of mineral extraction sites, the recorded occurrences of metallic minerals, the recorded location of former slate quarries and significant areas of slate waste and the recorded location of historic building stone quarries. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest. The data should not be used to determine individual planning applications or in taking decisions on the acquisition or use of a particular piece of land, although they may give useful background information which sets a specific proposal in context.