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178 record(s)
 
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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    Data from geophysical surveys in many African countries carried out by the British Geological Survey for different agencies. The surveys range from regional gravity and airborne magnetic mapping to targetted surveys for mineral and water. Individual surveys do not yet have metadata entries: this entry describes a notional database that represents all geophysical surveys carried out within the region.

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    During the period 1967 to 1971 a team of geoscientists carried out a programme of regional geological mapping in parts of Peru and a low-density regional geochemical exploration survey of the Western Cordillera of northern Peru. The work was funded by the UK Overseas Development Administration (ODA - now the Department for International Development, DfID) in collaboration with the Servicio de Geologia y Mineria (SGM), Lima, Peru (now INGEMMET). The geochemical exploration project was managed by a BGS geologist/ geochemist and supported by counterpart staff from the SGM. Locational and analytical data, maps and interpretative unpublished reports were deposited at the SGM in Lima in 1971. The geochemical data are a long term asset and continued interest in the results, particularly in recent years, has required that the data be made more readily available in a digital format. Some 1345 sites were sampled and stream sediments were analysed for Cu, Pb, Zn, (Co), Ag, Mo, (As), and (V). Raw data can be obtained from INGEMMET, AV Canada, 1470, San Borja, Lima, PERU. The sample location data have been digitised from a sample site map, as the original field sample cards and the port-a-punch cards were not retrievable in 1998/99. The sample site map was a paper copy - so, although the UTM co-ordinates for locations are given to the nearest metre, the true location of the original sample sites may vary by as much as 500 m, or in some cases even more. GENP 1967-71 was a low-density regional exploration survey based on the collection of some 1260 samples at key sites within the 25,000 km2 project area - a density of approximately 1 sample per 20 km2. Data cleaned for absent and below detection limit values.

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    The dataset comprises scanned images of maps and aerial photographs of the Falkland Islands. The original maps are printers films and final paper printed originals of Falkland Islands OS maps, compiled for the Falkland Islands Government and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office by the Overseas Directorate of the Ordnance Survey. The Falkland Islands Government retains copyright interest in the maps. There are no access or usage constraints for BGS staff for BGS purposes. The field slips of geological maps were compiled by BGS under contract to the Falkland Islands Government. Copyright remains with the Falkland Islands Government , but there are no access or usage constraints for BGS staff for BGS purposes. Access to both datasets are restricted to BGS staff.

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    The 3D multi channel seismic data were acquired as part of a collaborative investigation into models of magmatic segmentation between the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and BIRPS (the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate). The 3D EPR (East Pacific Rise) ARAD (Anatomy of a Ridge Axis Discontinuity) EW9707 cruise was undertaken in September and October 1997 to provide both refelction and wide-angle seismic data for the study of the overlapping spreading centre (OSC) at 9 degrees 3 minutes N on the East Pacific Rise. The data were acquired with a single source and a single streamer with a nominal line spacing of 100 m. The 3D-EPR ARAD survey was a joint NERC/NSF (US National Science Foundation) funded project and the copyright for this survey is held jointly. Reference: Bazin, S. Harding, AJ. et al. (2001) Three-dimensional shallow crustal emplacement at the 9 degree 03 minute N overlapping spreading center on the East Pacific Rise, Journal of Geophysical Research.

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    Airborne geophysical data acquired as part of the BGS-NERC TellusSW project (http://www.tellusgb.ac.uk/) during the second half of 2013. The survey comprised a high resolution magnetic/magnetic gradient survey combined with a multichannel (256 channel) radiometric survey. The survey was carried out using 200m (N-S) line separations at a mean elevation of 91m. Encompassing the counties of Cornwall and parts of Devon and Somerset, the survey provided 60,323 line-km of data. Digital data and derived (e.g. spatial derivatives) maps of the geophysical information are provided to facilitate spatial modelling of the soil, geological and environmental aspects of the data.

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    This dataset comprises 2 collections of maps. The facsmile collection contains all the marginalia information from the original map as well as the map itself, while the georectified collection contains just the map with an associated index for locating them. Each collection comprises approximately 101 000 monochrome images at 6-inch (1:10560) scale. Each image is supplied in .tiff format with appropriate ArcView and MapInfo world files, and shows the topography for all areas of England, Wales and Scotland as either quarter or, in some cases, full sheets. The images will cover the approximate epochs 1880's, 1900's, 1910's, 1920's and 1930's, but note that coverage is not countrywide for each epoch. The data was purchased by BGS from Sitescope, who obtained it from three sources - Royal Geographical Society, Trinity College Dublin and the Ordnance Survey. The data is for internal use by BGS staff on projects, and is available via a customised application created for the network GDI enabling users to search for and load the maps of their choice. The dataset will have many uses across all the geoscientific disciplines across which BGS operates, and should be viewed as a valuable addition to the BGS archive. There has been a considerable amount of work done during 2005, 2006 and 2007 to improve the accuracy of the OS Historic Map Collection. All maps should now be located to +- 50m or better. This is the best that can be achieved cost effectively. There are a number of reasons why the maps are inaccurate. Firstly, the original maps are paper and many are over 100 years old. They have not been stored in perfect condition. The paper has become distorted to varying degrees over time. The maps were therefore not accurate before scanning. Secondly, different generations of maps will have used different surveying methods and different spatial referencing systems. The same geographical object will not necessarily be in the same spatial location on subsequent editions. Thirdly, we are discussing maps, not plans. There will be cartographic generalisations which will affect the spatial representation and location of geographic objects. Finally, the georectification was not done in BGS but by the company from whom we purchased the maps. The company no longer exists. We do not know the methodology used for georectification.

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    Data from geophysical surveys carried out by the British Geological Survey in many countries in the Middle East, the Indian sub-continent and Indo-China for different agencies. The surveys range from regional gravity and airborne magnetic mapping to targetted surveys for mineral and water. Individual surveys do not yet have metadata entries: this entry describes a notional database that represents all geophysical surveys carried out within the region.

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    Coal resource maps for the whole of the UK have been produced by the British Geological Survey as a result of joint work with Department of Trade and Industry and the Coal Authority. The Coal Resources Map is a Map of Britain depicting the spatial extent of the principal coal resources. The map shows the areas where coal and lignite are present at the surface and also where coal is buried at depth beneath younger rocks. The maps are intended to be used for resource development, energy policy, strategic planning, land-use planning, the indication of hazard in mined areas, environment assessment and as a teaching aid. In addition to a general map of coal resources for Britain data also exists for the six inset maps: Scotland; North-East; North-West; East Pennines; Lancashire, North Wales and the West Midlands; South Wales, Forest of Dean and Bristol. Available as a paper map, flat or folded, from BGS Sales or as a pdf on a CD if requested.

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    Registers of microfossil analyses carried out by FW Anderson in London mainly during the 1950s and 1960s, but includes older collections,notably those of Davis (1935) and Burrows (1948). Specimens recorded are mainly ostracods, but include some foraminifera and some charophytes and holothurians. Sample number, locality/borehole, specimen identifications, remarks, cross referencing to the SAM and other data sets are given. The set is arranged: MIK(M) 1-4483 in 41 volumes on Mesozoic (predominantly) ostracods MIK(T) 1-1590 in 11 volumes, Tertiary foraminifera MIK( C) 1-400 in 5 volumes, Carboniferous ostracods MIK (J) 1-1219 in 8 volumes Jurassic microfossils (few identifications) MIK(K) 1-677 in 7 volumes Cretaceous microfossils (identifications patchy) MIK(J)F, MIK(K)F and MIK(T)F are small foreign collections.