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    Information for this layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) is taken from the BGS National Landslide Database (NLD), which holds over 15000 records of landslides and is the definitive source of landslide information for Great Britain (excludes Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands). Each landslide within the National Landslide Database is identified by a National Landslide Database ID number and a point location, as shown on this map. The National Landslide Database ID number represents an individual survey of a landslide, rather than just the landslide itself. This is because there could be several phases of movement within or extensions to the same landslide, particularly if it is a large and complex one. Subsequent surveys of the same landslide may be recorded in the database with the same National Landslide Database ID number but with a new Survey Number. Other information given for each record include; Landslide name, grid reference and whether the landslide record has been validated by the BGS Landslides Team. The point symbols at the designated location do not reflect the size and shape of the corresponding landslide, but just denote the recorded presence of a landslide within a range of accuracy.

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    This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of available Mineral Assessment Reports, the information for the index has been taken from the BGS UK Sand and Gravel Database. Each report studied the sand and gravel resources of an area of between one hundred and two hundred square kilometres. This layer shows individual polygons of the geographical areas covered by each report. Selecting the individual polygons via the map based index (GeoIndex) application gives details of the corresponding report title, number, author(s), subtitle and the date report was first published. The Department of the Environment commissioned this Report series from the British Geological Survey.

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    The map shows the location of excess sample materials from the G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment) geochemistry project:- stream sediments, panned heavy mineral concentrates and soils are stored long term in the National Geoscience Data Centre and are available for use in other projects. The Minerals Programme (incorporating the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme) sample collection contains reference samples of drill cores, rocks, tills, soils, stream sediments and panned concentrates. These samples were collected in the period 1974 - to date in mineralised and potentially mineralised areas of the United Kingdom, principally in the northern and western Britain.

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    The map shows the localities of significant fossil samples, either collected by BGS Staff, or donated by individuals and institutions. The BGS fossil collections contain over 2 million specimens, including a sizeable quantity of type, figured and cited material. Since a small number of fossil locations are confidential, you are unable to view this dataset at large scales. However, if you send a data enquiry, such information may be made available. Enquiries are normally free, but a charge may be levied depending upon the time taken; users will be notified in advance. Material is available for inspection on application by e-mail. Specimens are sometimes available for loan to bona fide academics.

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    This layer of the GeoIndex shows the localities for which details of identified fossil specimens in the BGS Biostratigraphy Museum are databased. Only Ordovician and Silurian specimens listed currently. Samples and taxonomic identifications will be listed and will in future be able to be queried using the query-by-attribute tool to the right of the map. See also Fossil Localities. Material is available for inspection on application by e-mail; it is free for academic research but is charged for commercial work. Specimens are sometimes available for loan to bona fide academics.

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    The surveys shown on the map based index (GeoIndex) include; Analogue airborne magnetic surveys of Great Britain for the Geological Survey (GSGB), commercial analogue survey of North Sea by Aeroservices Inc, subsequently digitised by BGS, commercial digital (+ one analogue) surveys off NW/N/NE of Britain by Huntings Geology and Geophysics, purchased outright by BGS and Local surveys, digital and analogue aeromagnetic (+ other methods) surveys for BGS and commercial companies.

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    This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the availability of 1:63360 scale geological maps. The maps are available for most of England and Wales and show early geological mapping covering the OS Old Series one inch map sheet areas.

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    This low-resolution image has been produced from BGS land and marine gravity data. The colour was generated using the BGS COLMAP software package. Colour levels are defined by histogram equalisation. Combining this image with the grey shaded relief image produces a similar image to the colour shaded relief image. The measured gravity values have been corrected in order to show the anomalies attributable to variations in crustal density. In broad terms the blues are attributable to large volumes of low density rocks, the reds to high density rocks. Significant lows occur, for instance, over areas of thick, low density sedimentary rocks(e.g. Cheshire Basin, Wessex Basin), or large granites (eg Cornwall). For marine data, free-air anomalies have been calculated from observed gravity values along marine survey lines. Line intersection errors between crossing lines and overlapping surveys have been used using network adjustment techniques. Free air anomalies have been calculated for sea-bottom stations. For land data, bouguer anomalies have been calculated from gravity observations at points of known height. In order to minimise the effect of topography, Bouguer corrections for the British Mainland have been applied using a density estimated for each station. Elsewhere a correction density of 2.67 Mg/m3 has been used. Corrections for the gravitational effect of terrain have been made where significant, and in a general extent to a radius of 48.6km. The data have been interpolated onto a 1km x 1km grid using a variable tension technique, and smoothed.

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    The data shows the location of seabed and sub-seabed samples collected from the UK continental shelf, held by BGS. A BGS Sample Station is a general location at which sampling with one or more equipment types, such as borehole, grab, dredge, has been used. Historically, all deployment of equipment was recorded with the same coordinates so the data shown here will often show several sets of data at the same location. Newer data will begin to show distinct locations based on an equipment type. This layer shows all the BGS Sample Station Locations, including those where the Sampling was unsuccessful. The layers below are divided into distinct equipment types, plus a separate layer for unsuccessful sampling. BGS Sample Station Locations can have a wide range of potential information available. This can vary from a basic description derived from a simple piece of paper up to a complex set of information with a number of datasets. These datasets can include particle size analysis, geotechnical parameters, detailed marine geology, geochemical analysis and others. Prices are available on further enquiry.

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    This low-resolution image has been produced from BGS airborne and marine magnetic data. The colour was generated using the BGS COLMAP software package. Colour levels are defined by histogram equalisation. Combining this image with the grey shaded relief image produces a similar image to the colour shaded relief image. A published coloured shaded relief map, using the full resolution of the data and produced at a scale of 1: 1500 000, is available. The map covers a larger area than this image, and includes additional data from other sources. The data used to compile this image are available in various forms for academic and commercial licensing. The data from surveys covering the UK mainland have been digitised from their original analogue form. Elsewhere data were acquired digitally. Standard methods of processing were used to remove diurnal and secular variations and to minimise line intersection errors. While efforts have been made to remove artefacts from the data, some may remain between adjacent datasets. Generally anomalies over man-made structures have not been removed. The data have been interpolated onto a 1km x 1km grid using a variable tension technique, and smoothed.