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    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to shrink and swell. Many soils contain clay minerals that absorb water when wet (making them swell), and lose water as they dry (making them shrink). This shrink-swell behaviour is controlled by the type and amount of clay in the soil, and by seasonal changes in the soil moisture content (related to rainfall and local drainage). The rock formations most susceptible to shrink-swell behaviour are found mainly in the south-east of Britain. Clay rocks elsewhere in the country are older and have been hardened by burial deep in the earth and are less able to absorb water. The BGS has carried out detailed geotechnical and mineralogical investigations into rock types known to shrink, and are modelling their properties across the near surface. This research underpins guidance contained in the national GeoSure dataset, and is the basis for our responses to local authorities, companies and members of the public who require specific information on the hazard in their areas. The BGS is undertaking a wide-ranging research programme to investigate this phenomenon by identifying those areas most at risk and developing sustainable management solutions. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

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    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of slope instability. Landslide hazard occurs due to particular slope characteristics (such as geology, gradient, sources of water, drainage, man-made constructions) combining to cause the slope to become unstable. Downslope movement of materials, such as a landslide or rockfall may lead to a loss of support and damage to buildings. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • Categories  

    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to compress under an applied load, a characteristic usually of superficial deposits such as peat or alluvium. Some types of ground may contain layers of very soft materials like clay or peat. These may compress if loaded by overlying structures, or if the groundwater level changes, potentially resulting in depression of the ground and disturbance of foundations. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

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    The Nirex Digital Geoscience Database (NDGD) holds extensive sets of data describing geoscientific, geographical, hydrogeological and logistical aspects of the Sellafield area in western Cumbria region. Some datasets comprise unmodified field data (as collected, measured or observed in the field). Others include values assessed during laboratory analysis or testing. Derived or interpolated information, resulting from modelling activity or the integration of several datasets, also accounts for a significant portion of the NDGD holding. The data consists of mainly borehole derived information including Borehole location and survey information, Sample location information, Logistics, Geological, geophysical (including borehole geophysical logs) and geotechnical borehole Geology datasets and Hydrological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical borehole datasets (though information from the down-hole monitoring strings and most groundwater related information is not held in the NDGD). The NDGD holds all of the raw and processed digital data arising from the Nirex (Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive) Sellafield Geological investigations boreholes drilled during their investigation programme into the suitability of Sellafield as a site for the disposal of intermediate and long-lived low level radioactive waste between 1989 and 1997. The ownership of Nirex (Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive) was transferred from the nuclear industry to the UK Government departments DEFRA and DTI in April 2005, and then to the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) in November 2006.

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    This low-resolution image has been produced from BGS land and marine gravity data. The colour was generated using the BGS COLMAP software package. Colour levels are defined by histogram equalisation. Combining this image with the grey shaded relief image produces a similar image to the colour shaded relief image. The measured gravity values have been corrected in order to show the anomalies attributable to variations in crustal density. In broad terms the blues are attributable to large volumes of low density rocks, the reds to high density rocks. Significant lows occur, for instance, over areas of thick, low density sedimentary rocks(e.g. Cheshire Basin, Wessex Basin), or large granites (eg Cornwall). For marine data, free-air anomalies have been calculated from observed gravity values along marine survey lines. Line intersection errors between crossing lines and overlapping surveys have been used using network adjustment techniques. Free air anomalies have been calculated for sea-bottom stations. For land data, bouguer anomalies have been calculated from gravity observations at points of known height. In order to minimise the effect of topography, Bouguer corrections for the British Mainland have been applied using a density estimated for each station. Elsewhere a correction density of 2.67 Mg/m3 has been used. Corrections for the gravitational effect of terrain have been made where significant, and in a general extent to a radius of 48.6km. The data have been interpolated onto a 1km x 1km grid using a variable tension technique, and smoothed.

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    An index to over 600 ground geophysical surveys carried out in the UK for a variety of projects. A large number of these surveys were done in conjunction with the DTI Mineral Reconnaissance Programme in the 1970's and 80's, and many others were carried out at the request of BGS field mapping groups. Information held describes the survey objective, location of measurements, geophysical methods and equipment used, reports and publications, storage locations of data and results (for analogue and digital data), dates and personnel. There are two datasets; one shows the outline of the survey areas, and the other shows the actual survey lines within each area.

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    This layer of the Map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of available UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) series 1:250000 geological maps. These maps display Bedrock, Quaternary (Superficial deposits) geology of the offshore areas and Seabed Sediments of the UK landmass and offshore regions. The different versions are normally published as separate maps for land areas, but these may be combined on a single map for offshore areas. Maps are normally available in flat and folded format. The UTM Series (Universal Transverse Mercator projection) maps cover an area of 1deg. latitude by 2deg. longitude.

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    The map shows the potential for the rocks to supply groundwater and the type of groundwater flow within the rocks. The dataset reattributes polygons in the Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain - 625k (DiGMapGB-625) Bedrock version 5 dataset to indicate whether the bedrock is an aquifer, the type of flow through the aquifer (fracture and fissure flow or intergranular flow) and how productive the aquifer is likely to be. The dataset is based on the known hydrogeological properties of rock types. The dataset covers just the bedrock formations for the UK and the Isle of Man. The data can be used for planning, environmental analysis, water supply and hazards.

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    This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the path the survey ship took whilst undertaking the ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry survey. This index is based on data from approximately 350,000 line kilometres of multi-instrument geophysical survey lines. The data itself includes seismic, sonar, magnetic, gravity, echo sounder, multibeam bathymetry and navigation data, both in digital and analogue format. The data were primarily collected by BGS and the collection also includes additional third party data.

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    The Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry England and Wales dataset indicates the estimated geometric mean topsoil Arsenic(As), Cadmium (Cd), Cr (Chromium), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) concentrations (mg kg-1). The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) soil geochemical data where these are available. Elsewhere the stream sediment data are converted to surface soil equivalent potentially harmful element (PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers England and Wales but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.