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    Data from the British Geological Survey's GeoIndex Offshore theme are made available for viewing here. GeoIndex is a website that allows users to search for information about BGS data collections covering the UK and other areas world wide. Access is free, the interface is easy to use, and it has been developed to enable users to check coverage of different types of data and find out some background information about the data. More detailed information can be obtained by further enquiry via the web site: www.bgs.ac.uk/geoindex.

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    Data from the British Geological Survey's GeoIndex Offshore (cultural data) theme are made available for viewing here. GeoIndex is a website that allows users to search for information about BGS data collections covering the UK and other areas world wide. Access is free, the interface is easy to use, and it has been developed to enable users to check coverage of different types of data and find out some background information about the data. More detailed information can be obtained by further enquiry via the web site: www.bgs.ac.uk/geoindex.

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    This service is the BGS contribution to the OneGeology project, providing UK onshore geological data at 1:625 000 scale and UK continental shelf seabed sediment data at 1:1 million scale. This map data is collected as part of an ongoing BGS project: Digital Geological Map of Great Britain (DiGMapGB). MapServer software is used to provide these OGC WMS and WFS services.

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    Data from the DiGMap covering the whole of the United Kingdom at a scale of 1:625 000 is available in this OGC WMS service for personal, non-commercial use only. The service is a contribution to the OneGeology-Europe initiative. The layers can be displayed either by age or by lithology. For more information about the digital maps available from the British Geological Survey, please visit http://www.bgs.ac.uk/products/digitalmaps/digmapgb.html.

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    The Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland dataset forms part of the BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product. This product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland; Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland; and Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland. The Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland dataset version 2 (2015) shows the relative vulnerability of groundwater to contamination across Scotland. Groundwater vulnerability is the tendency and likelihood for general contaminants to move vertically through the unsaturated zone and reach the uppermost water table after introduction at the ground surface. The groundwater vulnerability dataset was developed as a screening tool to support groundwater management at a regional scale across Scotland, and specifically to aid groundwater risk assessment. The data can be used to show the relative threat to groundwater quality from contamination, by highlighting areas at comparatively higher risk of groundwater contamination. The dataset is delivered at 1: 100 000 scale; the resolution of the dataset being 50m and the smallest detectable feature 100 m

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    The Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset forms part of the BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product. This product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland; Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland; and Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland. Aquifer productivity is a measure of the potential of aquifers to sustain a borehole water supply. The Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset version 2 (2015) indicates the location and productivity of superficial aquifers across Scotland, and their groundwater flow characteristics. Developed as a tool to support groundwater resource management, the dataset provides a guide to aquifer characteristics at a regional scale, and may be useful to anyone interested in learning more about, assessing or managing groundwater resources across Scotland. The dataset is delivered at 1: 100 000 scale; the resolution of the dataset being 50 m and the smallest detectable feature 100 m.

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    The property subsidence assessment dataset provides an understanding of the shrink-swell hazard at both the individual property and/or postcode level for England and Wales. It builds upon the BGS GeoSure shrink-swell data by mapping the hazard to the individual building polygon and considering the other susceptibility factors of building type, foundation depth, and drainage and tree proximity. The data consist of GIS building polygons with an overall susceptibility to subsidence score between 1-100. Scores are also classified from non-plastic to very high. Each building polygon is also scored from 1-10 for each subsidence factor (geology, foundation, drainage, building type, building storey and tree proximity). Postcode data is also available as a table showing the ‘average’ PSA score for all buildings within the postcode. The identification of shrink-swell related subsidence prone areas, alongside the inclusion of potential sources to exacerbate these phenomena, can better inform insurers and homeowners and form the basis to make decisions concerning prevention and remediation. The product enhances geological information obtained from GIP (BGS GeoSure Insurance Product) and GeoSure via the inclusion of the crucial shrink-swell susceptibility factors (proximity to trees and foundation depth). This therefore allows the derivation of a risk element for the housing stock at Building level, which is then generalised to Postcode level. BGS GeoSure - a series of GIS digital maps identifying areas of potential natural ground movement hazard in Great Britain

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    This dataset provides digital spatial information on the location of mineral resources in Wales at a scale of 1:50 000. The term ‘mineral resources’ has a definition under international standards that includes both an economic and geological dimension. These data are based primarily on mapped geology with limited assessment of economics. Therefore, the term ‘mineral resources’ is used here in a broad sense. The dataset allows users to visualise the extent and distribution of mineral resources and to relate them to other forms of land-use (such as urban areas or designated environmentally sensitive areas) or to other factors (such as transport infrastructure and conservation information). The British Geological Survey (BGS) was awarded a grant from the Welsh Assembly Government Aggregates Levy Fund in 2009 to provide a comprehensive, relevant and accessible information base to enhance the sustainability of mineral resources for Wales. BGS co-funded this project through its Sustainable Mineral Solutions project. This work was completed in 2010. This dataset comprises the digital GIS files which were produced through this project. The major elements of minerals information presented on the maps are; the geological distribution of all onshore mineral resources in Wales, the location of mineral extraction sites, the recorded occurrences of metallic minerals, the recorded location of former slate quarries and significant areas of slate waste and the recorded location of historic building stone quarries. In 2020 minor revisions to geometry and attributes were made in in response to minor corrections that were required. The paper maps were not re-released with these data updates. Point data for mineral occurrence and mine site data has not been included in this revision as these data are superseded by other BGS datasets, such as the BGS BritPits database of mines and quarries. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest.

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    The 1:250k Geological Maps of Northern Ireland comprise the Superficial Deposits Map (Drift, 1991) and the Bedrock Map (Solid Geology, 1997). These maps identify landscape areas based on their lithology. The scale of the maps is 1:250 000 and provides a simplified interpretation of the geology that may be used as a guide at a regional level, but should not be relied on for local geology. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. The Superficial map shows the deposits within the extent of the six Counties of Northern Ireland. The Bedrock map comprises the bedrock geology and contains dykes and geological faults. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy of the rocks. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Dykes defines small, narrow areas of a specific type of bedrock geology; that is igneous rocks which have been intruded into the landscape at a later date than the surrounding bedrock. Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The Bedrock map shows the main bedrock geological divisions in Northern Ireland and coverage extends to the west into the Republic of Ireland. The printed map includes a stratigraphic column. Digital datasets have been derived from the maps and comprise three layers. 1. Superficial polygons, 2. Bedrock polygons and 3. Linear features. Attribute tables describe the polygon features. These data are generalised and superseded by the 1:10k Geological Maps of Northern Ireland.

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    The IGRF is a global model of the geomagnetic field. It allows spot values of the geomagnetic field vector to be calculated anywhere from the Earth's core out into space. The IGRF is generally revised every five years by a group of modellers associated with the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA).