From 1 - 10 / 140
  • Categories  

    Data from the DiGMap covering the whole of the United Kingdom at a scale of 1:625 000 is available in this OGC WMS service for personal, non-commercial use only. The service is a contribution to the OneGeology-Europe initiative. The layers can be displayed either by age or by lithology. For more information about the digital maps available from the British Geological Survey, please visit http://www.bgs.ac.uk/products/digitalmaps/digmapgb.html.

  • Categories  

    The 1:50 000 scale GeoSure (natural ground stability) data covering the map sheets for Loughborough and Kilmarnock are available in this OGC WMS service for personal, non-commercial use only. This service is a contribution to the OneGeology-Europe initiative. For information about more of the British Geological Survey's maps and other digital products please visit http://www.bgs.ac.uk/products. MapServer software is used to provide this OGC WMS service.

  • Categories  

    Data from the British Geological Survey's GeoIndex Offshore theme are made available for viewing here. GeoIndex is a website that allows users to search for information about BGS data collections covering the UK and other areas world wide. Access is free, the interface is easy to use, and it has been developed to enable users to check coverage of different types of data and find out some background information about the data. More detailed information can be obtained by further enquiry via the web site: www.bgs.ac.uk/geoindex.

  • Categories  

    This service is the BGS contribution to the OneGeology project, providing UK onshore geological data at 1:625 000 scale and UK continental shelf seabed sediment data at 1:1 million scale. This map data is collected as part of an ongoing BGS project: Digital Geological Map of Great Britain (DiGMapGB). MapServer software is used to provide these OGC WMS and WFS services.

  • Categories  

    Data from the DiGMap covering the whole of the United Kingdom at a scale of 1:625 000 is available in this OGC WMS service for personal, non-commercial use only. The service is a contribution to the OneGeology-Europe initiative. The layers can be displayed either by age or by lithology. For more information about the digital maps available from the British Geological Survey, please visit http://www.bgs.ac.uk/products/digitalmaps/digmapgb.html.

  • Categories  

    The Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset forms part of the BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product. This product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland; Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland; and Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland. Aquifer productivity is a measure of the potential of aquifers to sustain a borehole water supply. The Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset version 2 (2015) indicates the location and productivity of bedrock aquifers across Scotland, and their groundwater flow characteristics. Developed as a tool to support groundwater resource management, the dataset provides a guide to aquifer characteristics at a regional scale, and may be useful to anyone interested in learning more about, assessing or managing groundwater resources across Scotland. The dataset is delivered at 1: 100 000 scale; the resolution of the dataset being 50 m and the smallest detectable feature 100 m.

  • Categories  

    BGS GeoScour provides river scour susceptibility information for Great Britain using a three-tiered data provision allowing increasing levels of understanding at different resolutions from catchment to local (channel/reach) scales. GeoScour includes 11 GIS layers, providing information on the natural characteristics and properties of catchment and riverine environments for the assessment of river scour in Great Britain. The data product fills a gap in current scour modelling, with the input of geological properties. It provides an improved toolkit to more easily assess and raise the profile of scour risk, now and in the future, to help infrastructure providers and funders prioritise resources, identify remedial works to preclude costly and prevent disruptive failures. The data product has broad applications through its adaptation to suit multiple types of asset likely to be affected by fluvial erosion. The GeoScour Data Product is designed to be used by multiple stakeholders with differing needs and therefore, can be interrogated at a number of levels. Tier 1 data provides a summary overview of the catchment characteristics, typical response type, and evolution. It can be used as a high-level overview for incorporation into catchment management plans, national reviews and catchment comparisons. Tier 2 data are available as smaller catchment areas and focusses on providing data for more detailed catchment management, natural flood management and similar uses. It analyses geological properties such as flood accommodation space, catchment run-off potential, and geomorphology types, as well as additional summary statistics of key environmental parameters such as protected sites and urban coverage. Tier 3 data provide the detailed riverine information that is designed to be incorporated into more complex river scour models. It provides the baseline geological context for river scour development and processes and identifies important factors that should be considered in any scour model. Factors such as material mineralogy, strength and density are key properties that can influence a river’s ability to scour. In addition, an assessment of river fall, sinuosity and flood accommodation space is also provided. This data is of use to all users assessing the propensity for river scour for any given reach of a river across Great Britain. Tier 1 and 2 data are available with an OGL, Tier 3 data is licenced.

  • Categories  

    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of slope instability. Landslide hazard occurs due to particular slope characteristics (such as geology, gradient, sources of water, drainage, man-made constructions) combining to cause the slope to become unstable. Downslope movement of materials, such as a landslide or rockfall may lead to a loss of support and damage to buildings. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • Categories  

    The Environment Agency has updated its groundwater vulnerability map to reflect improvements in data mapping, modelling capability and understanding of the factors affecting vulnerability. Two new maps are available which show the vulnerability of groundwater to a pollutant discharged at ground level. The potential impact of groundwater pollution is considered using the aquifer designation status which provides an indication of the scale and importance of groundwater for potable water supply and/or in supporting baseflow to rivers, lakes and wetlands. This dataset has shared IP (Intellectual Property) between Environment Agency and British Geological Survey. It supersedes the previous Groundwater Vulnerability 100k data released by EA.

  • Categories  

    This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) providex an index to 17,500 borehole rock samples (drillcore) from the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP) and related studies. The UK Government's Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) funded BGS to provide baseline information on areas prospective for the occurrence of metallic minerals in Great Britain. This programme, known as the MRP, ran continuously from 1973 to 1997 and covered particular locations across Great Britain. It was designed to stimulate private sector exploration and to encourage the development of Britain's indigenous mineral resources. Under the programme a number of boreholes were drilled to gather information.