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2015

57 record(s)
 
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    The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents a simplified version of the Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland, with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland is published in Z Daraktchieva, J D Appleton, D M Rees, K A M Adlam, A H Myers, S A Hodgson, N P McColl, G R Wasson and L J Peake, 2015. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland. PHE-CRCE-017, 22 pp. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the radon Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration exceeding the Action Level.

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    Scanned images of well logs for oil and gas exploration and appraisal wells drilled on the UK Continental Shelf and held on behalf of the Oil & Gas Authority (formerly the Department of Energy and Climate Change).

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    **This dataset has been superseded** The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGIP evaluates these hazards using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The newGIP is made up of 3 components. 1. Derived Postcode Database (DPD): this dataset contains generalised information at a postcode level and it’s updated on a 6 monthly basis. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. This product uses Code-Point® Open data to relate postcodes to Ordnance Survey grid references. This dataset is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 2. Unified Hazards (Vector Dataset): This is a detailed vector dataset providing spatial GIS information that can be used for more specific analysis at a higher resolution (e.g. site/address specific at 1:50k resolution). This dataset also has additional attributes outlining the type and scale of the potential hazards at any one location. This dataset is updated with the release of each version of DiGMapGB-50 and is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 3. Unified Hazards (Gridded Dataset): This dataset consists of a raster grid derived from the vector dataset; however, due to the raster grid format, the grid only carries limited attribution. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution.

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    The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland shows the estimated percentage of homes in an area exceeding the radon Action Level. This is the basic information to assigning the level of protection required for new buildings and extensions, as described in the Building Research Establishment guidance BR-413 Radon: Guidance on protective measures for new dwellings in Northern Ireland (2004). The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland is based on PHE indoor radon measurements and 1:10 000 or 1: 250 000 scale digital geology information provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the Action Level. PHE defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level. Further information on radon can be obtained from www.ukradon.org

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    The dataset is a subset of the BGS borehole material database, created on August 1st 2015 covering only the Bowland-Hodder geological unit (as defined and mapped by Andrews et al., 2013). It shows all boreholes (name, location and registration details) for which BGS hold borehole material (drillcore, cuttings, samples and their depth ranges). This data will add value to existing NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) data by allowing a simple route for users to identify borehole material from the Bowland-Hodder interval.

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    Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

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    Offprints of articles relating to Geomagnetism from 1822 to 1981. Offprints collected by Kew Observatory, Meteorological Office, Edinburgh and Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux castle). The first page of each offprint has been digitised to produce a finding aid.

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    Reflectance transformation image of a cast (BGS fossil reference number GSM106161) of the holotype of Charniodiscus concentricus. The original fossil is the property of the Geology Department, University of Leicester, and the fossil is on display at New Walk Museum, Leicester

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    Underground extraction of minerals and rocks has taken place in Great Britain for more than 5000 years. The dataset draws together a range of diverse information; the geology, the primary constraint on distribution; additional information sourced from published literature and knowledge from BGS experts. Areas of known underground mining are identified with an indication of the level of hazard associated for each site. The presence of former underground workings, particularly where shallow, may collapse, causing surface settlement or subsidence. The type of material mined, age and extent of working (where known) is used to assess and classify the hazard at each site. The value is based on an A (mining is not known to have occurred) to E (evidence of extensive underground mining is known) scale. Mining Hazard (not including coal) covers areas of known underground working in Great Britain. The coverage is not comprehensive as areas with no evidence of underground working are not included in the data. The dataset was created to provide a comprehensive overview of Great Britain's long and complicated mining legacy. It provides essential information for planners and developers working in areas where former underground mine workings may have occurred. Also for anyone involved in the ownership or management of property, including developers, householders and local government.

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    The BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity (Scotland); Superficial Aquifer Productivity (Scotland); and Groundwater Vulnerability (Scotland). Aquifer productivity is a measure of the potential of aquifers to sustain a borehole water supply. The Aquifer Productivity (Scotland) datasets indicate the location and productivity of bedrock and superficial aquifers across Scotland, and their groundwater flow characteristics. The Groundwater Vulnerability (Scotland) dataset shows the relative vulnerability of groundwater to contamination across Scotland. The BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product is developed as a tool to support groundwater resource management. It may be useful to anyone interested in learning more about, assessing or managing groundwater resources across Scotland. The datasets within the product are delivered at 1: 100 000 scale.