Creation year

2015

55 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Service types
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 55
  • Categories  

    The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings. This data is available as vector data, 25m gridded data or alternatively linked to a postcode database – the Derived Postcode Database. A series of GIS (Geographical Information System) maps show the most significant hazard areas. The ground movement, or subsidence, hazards included are landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product uses the individual GeoSure data layers and evaluates them using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The Derived Postcode Database (DPD) contains generalised information at a postcode level. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. It is available as a GIS point dataset or a text (.txt) file format. The DPD contains a normalised hazard rating for each of the 6 GeoSure themes hazards (i.e. each GeoSure theme has been balanced against each other) and a combined unified hazard rating for each postcode in Great Britain. The combined hazard rating for each postcode is available as a standalone product. The Derived Postcode Database is available in a point data format or text file format. It is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset has been created as vector data but is also available as a raster grid. This data is available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo coverage’s and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution. This dataset has been specifically developed for the insurance of low-rise buildings. The GeoSure datasets have been developed to identify the potential hazard for low-rise buildings and those with shallow foundations of less than 2 m deep. The identification of ground instability and other geological hazards can assist regional planners; rapidly identifying areas with potential problems and aid local government offices in making development plans by helping to define land suited to different uses. Other users of these data may include developers, homeowners, solicitors, loss adjusters, the insurance industry, architects and surveyors. Version 7 released June 2015.

  • Categories  

    High Resolution, Airborne Magnetic, Radiometric, VLF Survey over north Midlands of GB. Survey flying for the collaborative BGS and World Geoscience Corporation Ltd (WGC) high resolution geophysical and environmental survey was completed in early September 1998. The data comprise multi-channel gamma ray spectrometer, magnetometer and dual frequency VLF-EM. Flight line spacing was 400 m with tie lines at 1200 m and the total area surveyed is some 14 000 km2. Flight-line orientations are W–E over the western survey area, SW–NE over the eastern area. Ground clearance was maintained at 90 m in rural areas, increasing to about 240 m in built-up zones.

  • Categories  

    **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1**The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGIP evaluates these hazards using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The newGIP is made up of 3 components. 1. Derived Postcode Database (DPD): this dataset contains generalised information at a postcode level and it’s updated on a 6 monthly basis. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. This product uses Code-Point® Open data to relate postcodes to Ordnance Survey grid references. This dataset is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 2. Unified Hazards (Vector Dataset): This is a detailed vector dataset providing spatial GIS information that can be used for more specific analysis at a higher resolution (e.g. site/address specific at 1:50k resolution). This dataset also has additional attributes outlining the type and scale of the potential hazards at any one location. This dataset is updated with the release of each version of DiGMapGB-50 and is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 3. Unified Hazards (Gridded Dataset): This dataset consists of a raster grid derived from the vector dataset; however, due to the raster grid format, the grid only carries limited attribution. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution.

  • Categories  

    Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

  • Categories  

    The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents a simplified version of the Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland, with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland is published in Z Daraktchieva, J D Appleton, D M Rees, K A M Adlam, A H Myers, S A Hodgson, N P McColl, G R Wasson and L J Peake, 2015. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland. PHE-CRCE-017, 22 pp. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the radon Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration exceeding the Action Level.

  • Categories  

    Offprints of articles relating to Geomagnetism from 1822 to 1981. Offprints collected by Kew Observatory, Meteorological Office, Edinburgh and Greenwich Observatory (Herstmonceux castle). The first page of each offprint has been digitised to produce a finding aid.

  • Categories  

    The datasets contain FIB-SEM and X-ray micro-tomographic images of a wettability-altered carbonate rock sample before and after dissolution with reactive CO2-saturated brine at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions. The data were acquired with the aim of investigating CO2 storage in depleted oil fields that have oil-wet or mixed-wet conditions. Our novel procedure of injecting oil after reactive transport has revealed previously unidentified (ghost) regions of partially-dissolved rock grains that were difficult to identify in X-ray tomographic images after dissolution from single fluid phase experiments. The details of image files and imaging parameters are described in readme file.

  • Categories  

    The dataset consists of a spreadsheet containing whole rock geochemistry (Major and trace elements, Hf isotopes) from 7 samples and zircon U-Pb, O, Hf isotope and trace elements compositions (>200 spots on zircons from 7 samples) analysed by Ion Microprobe (NERC EIMF) and MC-LA-ICP-MS (NIGL). The samples are Eoarchaean amphibolite-facies mafic gneisses and a pegmatite as well as granulite-facies mafic gneiss and migmatite (melano- and leucosome) from the Kapuskasing uplift in Ontario, Canada.

  • Categories  

    Log file and GSAS data files for synchrotron study of NaMnF3. Diffraction patterns from synchrotron experiments on NaMnF3. NERC grant: Understanding the D' zone: novel fluoride analogues to MgSiO3 post perovskite NERC grant abstract: The thermal boundary layers of a convecting system control many aspects of its style of convection and thermo-chemical history. For the silicate Earth these boundary layers are the lithosphere, whose low temperature and high rigidity induces slab-style downwellings, and the D' region on the mantle side of the core-mantle-boundary (CMB). The D' region is the source of plume-style convection and regulates heat exchange from the core to the silicate Earth. The lower thermal boundary is made more complex by the existance of a phase transition in the most common mineral in the lower mantle (magnesium-silicate perovskite) which changes the properties of the D' region at the CMB. Unfortunately, most of these properties cannot be measured at the extreme pressures (120 GPa) of stabilisation of the post-perovskite phase. The best chance of constraining them is through a combination of measurements on low-pressure analogue materials (which have the same crystal structure but a different chemical composition) and ab initio simulations of both the analogue and natural systems. We have recently developed a set of ABF3 analogues whose properties are much more similar to MgSiO3 than are those of the CaBO3 analogues currently in use. We propose, therefore, to use these improved fluoride analogues to determine the properties of post-perovskite which control the dynamics of D' (phase diagram, pressure-temperature-volume relations, viscosity, slip systems and thermal diffusivity). These measurements will allow models to be developed which accurately predict the behaviour of the lower thermal boundary layer of the mantle. This will place coinstraints on (1) the heat budget, dynamo power and start of crystallisation of the inner core, (2)the vigour of plumes, (3) the ratio of underside heating to internal heating in the mantle and, (4) the radioactive element budget of the silicate Earth.

  • Categories  

    Fission track and U-Th-He data used to test HeFTy and QTQt thermal history modelling software. Longmen Shan, Szechuan Province, China. Data received from NERC grant NE/K003232/1 4He/3He laser microprobe analysis: a disruptive new technology for in-situ U-Th-He thermochronology. Three HeFTy input files and two QTQt input files containing fission track lengths and U-Th-He data needed to reproduce Figures 7 and 8 of Vermeesch and Tian (2014, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2014.09.010)