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2015

58 record(s)
 
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    High Resolution, Airborne Magnetic, Radiometric, VLF Survey over north Midlands of GB. Survey flying for the collaborative BGS and World Geoscience Corporation Ltd (WGC) high resolution geophysical and environmental survey was completed in early September 1998. The data comprise multi-channel gamma ray spectrometer, magnetometer and dual frequency VLF-EM. Flight line spacing was 400 m with tie lines at 1200 m and the total area surveyed is some 14 000 km2. Flight-line orientations are W–E over the western survey area, SW–NE over the eastern area. Ground clearance was maintained at 90 m in rural areas, increasing to about 240 m in built-up zones.

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    **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1**The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGIP evaluates these hazards using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The newGIP is made up of 3 components. 1. Derived Postcode Database (DPD): this dataset contains generalised information at a postcode level and it’s updated on a 6 monthly basis. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. This product uses Code-Point® Open data to relate postcodes to Ordnance Survey grid references. This dataset is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 2. Unified Hazards (Vector Dataset): This is a detailed vector dataset providing spatial GIS information that can be used for more specific analysis at a higher resolution (e.g. site/address specific at 1:50k resolution). This dataset also has additional attributes outlining the type and scale of the potential hazards at any one location. This dataset is updated with the release of each version of DiGMapGB-50 and is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). 3. Unified Hazards (Gridded Dataset): This dataset consists of a raster grid derived from the vector dataset; however, due to the raster grid format, the grid only carries limited attribution. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution.

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    The Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland dataset forms part of the BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product. This product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland; Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland; and Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland. The Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland dataset version 2 (2015) shows the relative vulnerability of groundwater to contamination across Scotland. Groundwater vulnerability is the tendency and likelihood for general contaminants to move vertically through the unsaturated zone and reach the uppermost water table after introduction at the ground surface. The groundwater vulnerability dataset was developed as a screening tool to support groundwater management at a regional scale across Scotland, and specifically to aid groundwater risk assessment. The data can be used to show the relative threat to groundwater quality from contamination, by highlighting areas at comparatively higher risk of groundwater contamination. The dataset is delivered at 1: 100 000 scale; the resolution of the dataset being 50m and the smallest detectable feature 100 m

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    The Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset forms part of the BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product. This product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity Scotland; Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland; and Groundwater Vulnerability Scotland. Aquifer productivity is a measure of the potential of aquifers to sustain a borehole water supply. The Superficial Aquifer Productivity Scotland dataset version 2 (2015) indicates the location and productivity of superficial aquifers across Scotland, and their groundwater flow characteristics. Developed as a tool to support groundwater resource management, the dataset provides a guide to aquifer characteristics at a regional scale, and may be useful to anyone interested in learning more about, assessing or managing groundwater resources across Scotland. The dataset is delivered at 1: 100 000 scale; the resolution of the dataset being 50 m and the smallest detectable feature 100 m.

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    The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland shows the estimated percentage of homes in an area exceeding the radon Action Level. This is the basic information to assigning the level of protection required for new buildings and extensions, as described in the Building Research Establishment guidance BR-413 Radon: Guidance on protective measures for new dwellings in Northern Ireland (2004). The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland is based on PHE indoor radon measurements and 1:10 000 or 1: 250 000 scale digital geology information provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the Action Level. PHE defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level. Further information on radon can be obtained from www.ukradon.org

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    Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

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    The BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product is comprised of three datasets: Bedrock Aquifer Productivity (Scotland); Superficial Aquifer Productivity (Scotland); and Groundwater Vulnerability (Scotland). Aquifer productivity is a measure of the potential of aquifers to sustain a borehole water supply. The Aquifer Productivity (Scotland) datasets indicate the location and productivity of bedrock and superficial aquifers across Scotland, and their groundwater flow characteristics. The Groundwater Vulnerability (Scotland) dataset shows the relative vulnerability of groundwater to contamination across Scotland. The BGS Hydrogeological Maps of Scotland data product is developed as a tool to support groundwater resource management. It may be useful to anyone interested in learning more about, assessing or managing groundwater resources across Scotland. The datasets within the product are delivered at 1: 100 000 scale.

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    Thermochronological data from IODP Bengal Fan site 354. Grant abstract: The Himalayas are a type example of continent-continent collision, and resultant mountain building processes. Geologists can look at the rocks in the mountain belt itself to determine its evolution, but sometimes the evidence in the rocks in the mountain belt itself is obscured by later increases in the temperature and pressure that the rocks were subjected to, which overprints the evidence. Sediments eroded off the evolving Himalaya are deposited in the Bengal Fan, and these can provide an archive of the erosion of the history of the mountain belt through time which has not been obscured my later metamorphism, as the material was eroded and removed from the mountain belt prior to these later overprinting events. This project will analyse minerals that cooled as they were exhumed from deoth towards the surface in the mountain belt. The project will date the minerals to determine the time they cooled, and this will provide information on when the rocks were exhumed and how fast they exhumed, thus providing information on when and how fast the mountain belt grew.

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    Posters and presentations from the UKCCSRC Call 1 Project: Mixed matrix membranes for post combustion carbon capture (Mar 2013 to Dec 2015). Membrane processes are a promising alternative to the more classical post-combustion capture technologies due to the reduced maintenance of the process, the absence of dangerous solvents and their smaller footprint. This project aims at supporting the development of new mixed matrix membranes for post-combustion applications. Mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) are composite materials formed by embedding inorganic fillers into a polymeric matrix in order to overcome the upper bound and combine the characteristics of the two solid phases: mechanical properties, economical processing capabilities and permeability of the polymer and selectivity of the filler. Despite several studies on the concept, the interactions between the two phases and their effect on the transport properties are not well understood. Yet, this fundamental knowledge is crucial in order to design the reliable materials needed for real-world-applications.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Advanced Sorbents for CCS via Controlled Sintering was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-206. Calcium looping shows significant promise for CO2 capture. The process can lead to an energy penalty as low as 6 - 8 % including the compression of the lean CO2 stream, compared to 9.5 - 12.5 % for amine-based post-combustion capture. To implement this technology on an industrial scale, a large quantity of CaO-based sorbent will be required, therefore the sorbent must be capable of being regenerated and reused.