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2017

73 record(s)
 
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    The 5km Hex GS Compressible Ground dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Compressible Ground v7 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to compress under an applied load, a characteristic usually of superficial deposits such as peat or alluvium. Some types of ground may contain layers of very soft materials like clay or peat. These may compress if loaded by overlying structures, or if the groundwater level changes, potentially resulting in depression of the ground and disturbance of foundations. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

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    The 5km Hex GS Collapsible Deposits dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Collapsible Deposits v7 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements.

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    The 1km Hex Mining Hazard (Not Including Coal) v7 dataset shows areas of known underground mining (Not Including Coal), identified with an indication of the level of hazard associated for each site. The presence of former underground workings, particularly where shallow, may collapse and cause surface settlement which is used to identify potential hazard at each site. The rating is based on a Low (limited mining known to have occurred) to High (underground mining is known to have occurred) scale. The dataset covers areas of known underground working in Great Britain. The coverage is not comprehensive as areas with no evidence of underground working are unclassified. Underground extraction of minerals and rocks has taken place in Great Britain for more than 5000 years. This dataset draws together a range of diverse information; the geology, the primary constraint on distribution; additional information sourced from published literature and knowledge from BGS experts. Derived from the original MiningHazardNotIncludingCoalGB_v7 dataset, this layer generalises these data into a Hex grid format, with an effective hexagonal grid resolution of 2.6km coverage area (side length of 1km). The dataset was created to provide a comprehensive overview of Great Britain's long and complicated mining legacy. It provides essential information for planners and developers working in areas where former underground mine workings may have occurred. Also for anyone involved in the ownership or management of property, including developers, householders and local government.

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    The 5km Hex GS Soluble Rocks dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Soluble Rocks v7 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Soluble Rocks methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for dissolution within a geological deposit. Ground dissolution occurs when certain types of rock contain layers of material that may dissolve if they get wet. This can cause underground cavities to develop. These cavities reduce support to the ground above and can lead to a collapse of overlying rocks. Dissolution of soluble rocks produces landforms and features collectively known as 'karst'. Britain has four main types of soluble or 'karstic' rocks; limestone, chalk, gypsum and salt, each with a different character and associated potential hazards. Engineering problems associated with these karstic rocks include subsidence, sinkhole formation, uneven rock-head and reduced rock-mass strength. Sinkhole formation and subsidence has the potential to cause damage to buildings and infrastructure. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

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    The Environment Agency has updated its groundwater vulnerability map to reflect improvements in data mapping, modelling capability and understanding of the factors affecting vulnerability. Two new maps are available which show the vulnerability of groundwater to a pollutant discharged at ground level. The potential impact of groundwater pollution is considered using the aquifer designation status which provides an indication of the scale and importance of groundwater for potable water supply and/or in supporting baseflow to rivers, lakes and wetlands. This dataset has shared IP (Intellectual Property) between Environment Agency and British Geological Survey. It supersedes the previous Groundwater Vulnerability 100k data released by EA.

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    The Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales have updated its groundwater vulnerability map to reflect improvements in data mapping, modelling capability and understanding of the factors affecting vulnerability. Two new maps are available which show the vulnerability of groundwater to a pollutant discharged at ground level. The potential impact of groundwater pollution is considered using the aquifer designation status which provides an indication of the scale and importance of groundwater for potable water supply and/or in supporting baseflow to rivers, lakes and wetlands. This dataset for Wales has shared intellectual property (IP) between Natural Resources Wales and British Geological Survey.

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    The 5km Hex GS Shrink Swell dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Shrink Swell v7 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Shrink Swell methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to shrink and swell. Many soils contain clay minerals that absorb water when wet (making them swell), and lose water as they dry (making them shrink). This shrink-swell behaviour is controlled by the type and amount of clay in the soil, and by seasonal changes in the soil moisture content (related to rainfall and local drainage). The rock formations most susceptible to shrink-swell behaviour are found mainly in the south-east of Britain. Clay rocks elsewhere in the country are older and have been hardened by burial deep in the earth and are less able to absorb water. The BGS has carried out detailed geotechnical and mineralogical investigations into rock types known to shrink, and are modelling their properties across the near surface. This research underpins guidance contained in the national GeoSure dataset, and is the basis for our responses to local authorities, companies and members of the public who require specific information on the hazard in their areas. The BGS is undertaking a wide-ranging research programme to investigate this phenomenon by identifying those areas most at risk and developing sustainable management solutions. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

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    Surface waters and shallow groundwater samples were collected by completely filling 30 mL polyethylene bottles, which were then sealed with electrical tape to minimise the risk of evaporative loss. Rainwater samples were integrated samples of total monthly rainfall collected in a specially-adapted rainfall collector following IAEA protocols (IAEA http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/ih/documents/userupdate/sampling.pdf [accessed 22 June 2012). Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were determined simultaneously using a 'Picarro' WS-CRDS system at the University of Liverpool or the University of Cambridge. Jamaica, Parish of St Elizabeth. Wallywash Great Pond (lat: 17.9716°; long: -77.8068°) (lake water and groundwater samples) and Pon de Rock Guest House (lat: 17.9156°; long: -77.7973°) (rainwater samples). Refer to accompanying map for the precise location of the lake water sampling sites

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    The dataset worksheet contains a list of core samples taken during IODP Exp 350 and foraminifera-based data for selected samples. The work was started with the aim of reconstructing palaeoproductivity changes (namely surface-to-deep carbon isotope gradients and U/Ca measurements) over tephra layers in order to test the ‘ash fertilisation hypothesis’. However, the work has been temporarily halted given the on-board volcanologists ongoing concerns that the ash layers in the selected cores have been reworked and therefore are not primary. Because of the induration and silicification of the core samples at quite shallow depths in the core, the other aim of the project (to reconstruct palaeoceanographic changes from 16-0 Ma) was not possible. The spreadsheet contains a full list of samples and a list of samples that have been examined and analysed. The data worksheet contains the no. of Globigerinoides ruber (with weight), Oridorsalis umbonatus, Uvigerina spp. and Cibicidoides spp. specimens for specific samples. For selected samples, stable oxygen and carbon isotopes are given and a graph of the carbon isotopes vs depth in core is presented.

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    Sample list and experimental conditions. Ilumina Mi Sequencing OTU results for samples from Acoje Nickel Laterite, Philippines and Shevchenko, Ukraine. Illumina Mi Sequencing Results from Acoje, Philippines and Shevchenko Ukraine. These data are from a proof of concept study examining the bioextraction of cobalt and nickel from laterites stored at the Natural history Museum. The data here represent the sequencing of the microbial populations in the laterite samples from Acoje, Philippines, and Shevchenko, Ukraine.