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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides details of the regulatory work carried out during FEED to achieve the legal requirements of constructing and operating an End-to-End CCS system within European, UK and Scottish legislative frameworks, including implications for consenting of the power plant from which CO2 is to be captured. During the development of the Outline Solution for the UKCCS Demonstration Competition, the Consortium developed a comprehensive Consents Register that tracks month by month progress and captures all relevant Consents, permits and licenses required by the End-to-End CCS chain. A summary of the Consortium progress as of the end of Q1 2011 is provided. Written against a backdrop of significant regulatory change and uncertainty, this report also outlines the process undertaken in identifying consenting risk and provides commentary on the key risks identified, as contained within the project Risk Register. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Consents and permitting.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/consents/consents.aspx

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter presents the results of studies into the undersea storage reservoir for CO2, in the Lower Bunter sandstone of the depleted Hewett natural gas field, the design recommendations for new wells and recommendations for abandonment of existing wells. The study addresses the following areas; Storage Reservoir integrity and capacity; Construction and completion of wells; CO2 properties and injectivity; Abandonment of existing and new wells; Monitoring; Hazard Identification (HAZID) and Risk Assessment. Some of the key aspects of the Wells and Storage technical design are; Wells that have already been abandoned using conventional methods pose a risk of future leakage to the surface and thereby compromising the integrity of the CO2 store; Data acquisition can be difficult: ensure that all required data sets are identified and make requests as early as possible to ensure quality data is obtained resistant standards; The CO2 equation of state and phase diagram is paramount in designing the injection process. Temperature and pressure of the CO2 must be carefully specified to avoid uncontrolled condensation or vaporisation; Many standard components and materials used in the offshore industry are suitable for use in CO2 flowing regime injection applications. Particular attention must be paid to corrosion resistance and longevity in a CO2 environment; For drilling injection wells into a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir, the principal challenge is drilling into low pore pressures, whilst minimising formation damage. Further supporting documents for Chapter 7 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/storage/storage.aspx

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter is devoted to the transportation and injection infrastructure requirements of the Kingsnorth Carbon Capture and Storage development. This encompasses a 36 inch (outside diameter) pipeline which runs onshore for approx 10 km and offshore in the Southern North Sea for 260 km, a platform in the vicinity of the Hewett field location, and appropriate facilities both for the conditioning of CO2 before pipeline entry and the processing of the CO2 stream prior to injection into the sequestration site. The chapter highlights in particular the following areas:- Critical assumptions; Platform Concept Selection; Transport Solution Selection; Pipeline Key Issues; Pipeline Pre-Commissioning; Temperature; Emergency Shutdown; Personnel Safety; Venting; Flow Assurance Modelling. Throughout the execution of the work described in this chapter significant opportunity was taken to ensure that the interfaces from capture (and compression) to pipeline/platform and to wells/storage were managed closely. This was achieved by cross system interface management meetings organized to consider interface issues and to compare issues raised in separate HAZIDs. The purpose of conceptual design has been to identify the problems to be addressed comprehensively by the next stage of FEED and this suite of reports provides valuable insights to the challenges faced. All aspects of establishing an agreed philosophy for design and operation of a storage and transport system for CCS begin with understanding what the initial CO2 flow conditions will be at the interface between the well perforations and the reservoir (i.e. at the sandstone face at the bottom of the well). Further supporting documents for chapter 6 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded.

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. The UK Government's basic premise for financially supporting CCS demonstration is to facilitate further commercial scale CCS projects in the UK and internationally. DECC have made knowledge transfer activities a key requirement of the UKCCS Demonstration Competition. The Consortium identified stakeholder groups particularly relevant for knowledge transfer activities. Stakeholders were categorised in terms of: Knowledge needs; Potential to influence CCS deployment; Experience/ expertise they can bring to demonstration knowledge; Potential to disseminate demonstration knowledge; The assessment identified six priority audience groups: Academics, Environmental NGOs, Finance and Insurance, Industry, Initiatives and Developers and Regulatory and Policy. The Stakeholder Profiling Interviews sought to answer the following questions: Who are the key CCS stakeholders? What information are these stakeholders interested in from a CCS demonstration? What are the preferred methods for key stakeholders to receive and access information? Are the key stakeholders interested in interacting with CCS demonstrations, and if so, what is the preferred method to facilitate this interaction? This section of the FEED Close Out Report combines over 30 stakeholder interviews, with examples of knowledge transfer leading practice. Other FEED workstreams considered wider stakeholder engagement, for example, local community engagement and public communication. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Stakeholder profiling.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/stakeholder/stakeholder.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This chapter contains the output from many of the Project Management processes which control and report the progress of the FEED. The following commentary gives the reader a brief guide to the project management process or approach which has been used. FEED Programme: In order to scope out, control and report the FEED activity, a Work Breakdown Structure was developed. This structure had the following hierarchy - Level 1 - Chain Element; Level 2 - Phase; Level 3 - Discipline; Level 4 - Work Package (including Cost Time Resource definition); The programme is in the form of a fully resource loaded, logically linked network diagram. Risk Management: Throughout this FEED the management of risk was a key activity. This has helped inform and better understand the important risks faced by the project. This 'first of a kind' project saw a large number of new risks being identified, assessed, controlled and monitored during FEED. Project Cost Estimates: An estimating philosophy was established in FEED to set the standards for the estimates produced from across the project participants, including: To ensure a consistent approach in the collection, calculation and presentation of costs across all FEED Participants; To ensure that all likely project costs are identified and captured along with all associated details. A standard template was established for each participant to complete with the details of their section (i.e. Chain Element) of the cost estimate. The cost estimate was broadly consistent with Class 3/4 estimate as defined by AACE. Further supporting documents for chapter 10 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/abstract/abstract.aspx

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter contains design philosophy documents which were produced to ensure a common approach to the design of all aspects of the CCS project, addressing overall project lifecycle and the interface between the Carbon Capture Plant and the Power Station. Some of the key issues concerning the design and integration of a CCS development are: Power plants have been designed for many years to operate flexibly in response to the demands of the electricity network. The CCS plant technology is closer to process plant technology which is not usually designed for such flexible operation, and this will provide a key challenge during the detailed design process to provide the required flexibility of operation; Assessment of various cooling technologies for the power station and carbon capture plant shows that direct water cooling is the Best Available Technology in terms of Environmental Impact; Significant parts of the existing cooling water infrastructure can be re-used; There is potential to advantageously interface steam and cooling systems between the power plant and CCS plant; Venting, and the consequent cooling, of CO2 for pressure relief or operational reasons raises issues with lack of buoyancy and dispersion which require significant further work. Further supporting documents for chapter 4 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/project_design/project_design.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides a summary of key decisions and design changes made during FEED that have resulted from the development of the End-to-End solution and the design works conducted by each of the Consortium Partners. The information described in this section captures the design decisions and changes that have had the most prominent impact on the End-to-End Basis of Design. For each key design change/decision, the background, options considered and the final outcome is described. The ScottishPower CCS Consortium Decision Register can be found in PDFs . The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Key FEED decisions.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/feed_decisions/feed_decisions.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report aims to inform potential developers of CCS of the impact of risks on the design of large-scale CCS. It discusses the ScottishPower CCS Consortium approach to risk management, looking particularly at the identification and mitigation of specific areas of risks during FEED and the mitigating actions required for the major residual risks. The section covers five key areas: Overview of the risk assessment process through FEED, including mitigation measures, major movement of the Top 50 risks on the Risk Register, and current active risks; Mitigation strategies for major project risks; Mitigation strategies for those risks with the potential to cause significant delay to the Overall Project Programme; Allocation and insurability of risks; Integrity and risk assessment of existing plant to be integrated; From the outset of FEED, risk management was co-ordinated by the Risk Workstream. The Risk Workstream included representatives of each of the Consortium Partners and Aker Clean Carbon. The Risk Workstream had a remit to capture, codify and report on progress with risk management throughout the study. The management of the risks themselves remained with the risk owners. The Consortium's risk management strategy was based on the provision of a cross-Consortium, over-arching risk management framework. This was developed to: Provide visibility of the Consortium's risk exposure Make best use of the Consortium Partners' risk management experience Facilitate the assessment of the impact of changes within the scope of one Partner's risk profile to the others Encourage the identification of risks at Partner interfaces Provide consistent risk reporting across the Consortium in line with agreed requirements Each Consortium Partner was responsible for reporting monthly on their risks to the Consortium risk lead, who in turn collated the Consortium Partner updates and reported the overall Consortium risk status to the Consortium Management Office and DECC to show how the total risk value changed over the course of FEED. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Risk management.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/risk/risk.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report contains the cost estimate for the End-to-End CCS chain for the purposes of providing potential developers of CCS projects with indicative cost information regarding capital expenditure, operating costs and decommissioning/ abandonment costs. One of the key objectives of the FEED phase of the UKCCS Demonstration Competition was to increase the cost certainty for the overall project. During development of the Outline Solution, costs were estimated to an accuracy of -30% to +50%. Through the design and project development across the various Consortium workstreams (as outlined in the previous sections of this report), it has been possible to refine this accuracy and increase the cost certainty of the indicative core capital costs to approximately -12%/+15% accuracy. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (CCS project costs.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/ccs_costs/ccs_costs.aspx

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This Key Knowledge Reference Book is the result of the early stages of a Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) study to add a post-combustion Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) facility to a new supercritical coal fired power plant at Kingsnorth following the award of a FEED contract with the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) in March 2010. This study constitutes the first phase of a 3-phase approach to FEED adopted by E.ON UK. The Kingsnorth CCS Project consists of two 800MW power generating units at Kingsnorth power station, a 300MW (net) post combustion carbon capture plant integrated into the power plant with associated dehydration and compression facilities, a 36inch pipeline for transportation of CO2 to the Hewett gas field in the southern North Sea and a new platform at this field with associated injection facilities and wells. The Key Knowledge Reference Book is publicly available to all CCS project developers and other interested parties to ensure the lessons learned from this FEED are disseminated as widely as possible to advance the roll-out of Carbon Capture and Storage. This Key Knowledge Reference Book comprises information provided in the following structure: Chapter: 1 Executive Summary. 2 Content. 3 Table of Acronyms. 4 Project Design. 5 Technical Design - Carbon Capture and Compression Plant. 6 Technical Design - Pipeline and Platform. 7 Technical Design - Wells and Storage. 8 Health and Safety. 9 Environment and Consents. 10 Project Management Reports. Summary commentary on each of the chapters is provided to give both context to the information supplied and to pull out key areas of learning in each section. The Key Knowledge Reference Book is available for download and supporting materials for each chapter are available. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/executive_summ/executive_summ.aspx