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    Thermochronological data from IODP Bengal Fan site 354. Grant abstract: The Himalayas are a type example of continent-continent collision, and resultant mountain building processes. Geologists can look at the rocks in the mountain belt itself to determine its evolution, but sometimes the evidence in the rocks in the mountain belt itself is obscured by later increases in the temperature and pressure that the rocks were subjected to, which overprints the evidence. Sediments eroded off the evolving Himalaya are deposited in the Bengal Fan, and these can provide an archive of the erosion of the history of the mountain belt through time which has not been obscured my later metamorphism, as the material was eroded and removed from the mountain belt prior to these later overprinting events. This project will analyse minerals that cooled as they were exhumed from deoth towards the surface in the mountain belt. The project will date the minerals to determine the time they cooled, and this will provide information on when the rocks were exhumed and how fast they exhumed, thus providing information on when and how fast the mountain belt grew.

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    Organic and inorganic data extracted from core material spanning over a large area of the Baltic basin (Kostovo-13, Grotlingbo-1, File Haidar-1, Boda Hamn-1, Hamnudden-1, Finngrundet-1, Barstad-2 and Bernstorp-1). Organic data include concentrations in pristane, phytane, phenanthrene, methylphenanthrene and arylisoprenoids. Inorganic data include iron speciation data, concentrations in Fe, Al, P, U, Mo, V, total organic C, and C isotope ratios.

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    Table containing Fe speciation data, C isotope data, Total organic carbon contents, and Fe, Al, P, Mn and Sr elemental concentrations.

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    The following dataset provides climate and cave monitoring data from Cueva de Asiul northern Spain between 2010 and 2014. This data set was initially presented in Smith et al., (2016) Cave monitoring and the potential for palaeoclimate reconstruction from Cueva de Asiul, Cantabria (N. Spain). International Journal of Speleology, 45(1), 1-9. This data set represents the majority of cave monitoring undertaken at this site as part of a NERC funded PhD project (NERC studentship grant NE/I527953/1), data collection either occurred within this single cave site (43°19’0’’N, 3°35’28’’W) or within 1km of the cave in the village of Matienzo. The data set includes high resolution monitoring data for a range of climatic parameters including, cave and external temperature, rainfall direction, amount and oxygen isotope value, soil and cave air pCO2 concentration and carbon isotope value, cave drip rates and oxygen and deuterium isotope values. All data was collected using standard automated logging systems and the data/ samples were analysed either at Lancaster University, UK or at the NERC isotope geosciences laboratory, British Geological Survey, UK. Any missing data is a result of automated logger malfunction and is explained in full in the above cited paper. In combination this data offers a very high resolution, multiyear veiw into hydrological and cave ventilation processes, each of which play a major role in controlling speleothem growth and chemical makeup in Cueva de Asiul. The data set presents the pertinent background monitoring for the accurate interpretation of speleothems from this cave site. Those who may be interested in the data set include cave scientists who wish to implement a monitoring station/understand how climatic parameters influence speleothem development, or those who wish to obtain focused climate data from the Matienzo region between 2010 and 2014. The data set was collected by members of Lancaster University and the Matienzo caving expedition as part of NERC studentship grant NE/I527953/1. All cave monitoring was undertaken with kind permission from Gobierno de Cantabria, Cultura.

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    The data set provides climate and cave monitoring data from Cueva de Asiul, Cantabria, northern Spain. This data was initially presented in graphical form in Smith et al., (2015) - Drip water Electrical Conductivity as an indicator of cave ventilation at the event scale. Science of the Total Environment, 532, 517-527. All data was collected from within the cave or within a 1km radius of the cave site (43°19'0"N, 3°35'28"W) using instrumentation set up as part of a PhD project running between January 2010 and January 2014. The data set includes high resolution event based monitoring data for a range of climatic parameters - cave and external temperature, rainfall amount, soil pCO2 cave air pCO2 concentration, cave drip water calcium saturation, drip water electrical conductivity and cave air pressure. This data was analysed at Lancaster University, UK or at the NERC isotope geosciences laboratory, British Geological Survey, UK. Any missing data from this 4 year period is a result of instrument malfunction and is clearly explained within the above cited paper. The electrical conductivity component of the data set offers the first data set of this type form any cave system, using a submerged CTD Diver probe and novel piston flow housing. The rest of the data constitute a part of a larger cave monitoring data set produced during the project using a number of standard automated cave monitoring devices. When combined this data leads us to conclude that cave drip water electrical conductivity is driven primarily by changes in cave air pCO2 at Cueva de Asiul and therefore responds to cave ventilation dynamics, rather than by changes in karst water residence time. Without such extremely high resolution monitoring the impact of cave ventilation on event based changes in drip water electrical conductivity would not have been established for this site. This data set should be of interest to anyone studying similar cave sites, interested in the role of electrical conductivity as a monitoring tool within caves and cave ventilation on speleothem growth dynamics. The data set was collected by members of Lancaster University and the Matienzo caving expedition as part of NERC studentship grant NE/I527953/1. All cave monitoring was undertaken with kind permission from Gobierno de Cantabria, Cultura.