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    This data was generated at the University of Kiel, Germany by Wolfgang Kuhnt, paid for by Dr Littler as part of her 2016 NERC Moratorium Award. The data comprises XRF-derived elemental abundances from two Holes (A and B) for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site U1448, spanning approximately the Pliocene period.

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    Non -contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) images of surface nanobubbles on the fluorcarbonate mineral synchysite. Synchysite is a rare earth fluorcarbonate mineral which has previously been relatively unstudied. Since nanobubbles were first imaged in 2000, they have been thought to play a intigral role in mineral processing. Images of nanobubbles were produced under collector reagent conditions favourable to flotation. These are the first images of nanobubbles on the fluorcarbonate mineral synchysite. Nanobubbles at the surface of synchysite improve the understanding of both flotation and nanobubble formation.

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    This document is the drillers log of strata encountered during site investigation work. The log was made in the field during drilling at Prees, Shropshire on 8th to 10th January 2020. The log includes basic information on lithology and drilling equipment used and depths of the individual core runs.

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    Zeta potential measurements of rare earth element enriched apatite from Jacupiranga, Brazil under water and collector conditions. Zeta potential measurements can be used to indicate the surface behaviour of a mineral under different reagent conditions. Mineral surface behaviour is important in processing and extracting minerals from their host ore, which can be energy intensive. Apatite is a phosphate mineral which can become enriched with rare earth elements. Rare earth elements are important in a wide range of products from iPhones to wind turbines.

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    Benthic stable isotope (carbon and oxygen) data from IODP Site U1445. Generated by Yasmin Bokhari-Friberg, supervisied by Kate Littler and Pallavi Anand.

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    This dataset comprises raw carbon, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope data on water (precipitation and terrestrial) and plant cellulose from Empodisma-dominated peatlands throughout New Zealand. This data has been published in two open access papers: Amesbury, M. J., Charman, D. J., Newnham, R. M., Loader, N. J., Goodrich, J. P., Royles, J., Campbell, D. I., Roland, T. P. and Gallego-Sala, A. V. 2015. Carbon stable isotopes as a palaeoclimate proxy in vascular plant dominated peatlands. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 164, 161-174. Amesbury, M. J., Charman, D. J., Newnham, R. M., Loader, N. J., Goodrich, J. P., Royles, J., Campbell, D. I., Keller, E. D., Baisden, W. T., Roland, T. P. and Gallego-Sala, A. V. 2015. Can oxygen stable isotopes be used to track precipitation moisture source in vascular plant dominated peatlands? Earth and Planetary Science Letters 430, 149-159.

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    Description of peatland sites included in the compilation of carbon accumulation rates, including resolution (high, low), interpolation (yes/no), contributor name, country, lon, lat, peatland type, dominant plant type, no. of dates used in the last millenium carbon accumulation rate calculation, and problems with the data. Peatland sites at northern hemisphere high and mid latitudes (260), tropical (30) and southern hemisphere high latitudes (7 sites).

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    Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy images (NC-AFM) of surface nanobubbles on the carbonate mineral dolomite. Since surface nanobubbles were first imaged in 2000, they have been of growing interest to research due to their long lived properties, with reported lifetimes as long as several hours. Images of nanobubbles were produced under water, collector and depressant conditions using the air water supersaturation method. These are the first images of surface nanobubbles on dolomite. Surface nanobubbles could play a part in the processing of dolomite via froth flotation. These images lay a foundation for future analysis of the effect of nanobubbles in flotation.

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    This dataset comprises a record of benthic foraminifera count data from three cores that were analysed to assess down core changes in foraminifera abundance from the Paluma Shoals reef complex, Halifax Bay, central Great Barrier Reef, Australia; cores OPS-PC2, OPS-C-PC1 and OPS-D-PC1. The site/core names relate to the sites described in the following paper: Morgan KM, Perry CT, Smithers SG, Daniell JJ and Johnson JA (2016) Extensive reef development within the “mesophotic” nearshore Great Barrier Reef: Evidence for intra-regional variations in coral resilience. Scientific Reports 6:29616. DOI: 10.1038/srep29616.

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    From being a metal with very limited natural distribution,indium (In) has recently become disseminated throughout the human society. Little is know of how In compounds behave in the natural environment, but recent medical studies link exposure to In compounds to elevated risk of respiratory disorders. Animal tests suggest that exposure may lead to more widespread damage in the body, notably testicular cancer. In this paper, we investigate the solubility of the most widely used In compound, indium-tin oxide (ITO) in simulated lung and gastric fluids in order to better understand the potential pathways for metals to be introduced into the bloodstream. Our results show significant potential for release of In and tin (Sn) in the deep parts of the lungs (artificial lysosomal fluid) and digestive fluids, while the solubility in the upper parts of the lungs (the respiratory tract or tracheobronchial tree, simulated by Gamble's solution) is very low. Our study confirms that ITO is likely to remain as solid particles in the upper parts of the lungs, but that particles are likely to at dissolve in the deep lungs. Considering the prolonged residence time of inhaled particles in the deep lung and the high solubility of ITO in artificial lysosomal fluids, the environment of the deep lungs is likely to provide the major route for assimilation of In and Sn from inhaled ITO nano- and microparticles. Digestion is likely to also lead to assimilation through dissolution in the stomach and interaction with digestive enzymes in the pancreatic juice. However, this route is less likely to lead to substantial assimilation because of the much shorter residence times of particles in the digestive system.