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    This dataset contains the .tif (Tag Image File Format) scans of all the applied geology maps (otherwise known as thematic or environmental) and sections produced as part of "Geological background for planning and development" and preliminary sand and gravel projects carried out by the British Geological Survey for the Department of the Environment, Scottish Development Department and Scottish Office from 1975 to 1996. The maps and sections cover a number of themes for specific areas relating to the project area within the United Kingdom. Metadata on the maps, sections and project reports are in the associated excel spreadsheet. The geological line work and the methods used to produce the maps are those current at the time of production. Map scales are 1:10 000, 1:25 000 and 1:50 000. The maps have Ordnance Survey map bases and are bounded by the project area. The maps could be used for geological, engineering geological, environmental and resources research, as an information and reference resource and for inclusion in reports and papers. There are no access or usage constraints for BGS staff for BGS purposes. The scans are .tif files and can, therefore, be displayed using any suitable package. The original file size varies between 170 kb to 250 Mb. The dataset is stand-alone.

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    In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2014 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads, it supercedes the earlier 2012 version. The model complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 25,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them together and incorporate around 300 deep stratigraphic boreholes across England and Wales. The sections also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the scientific literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram has been built in stages between 2009-14 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme the Environment Agency of England and Wales, and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. Some 16 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

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    These files contain ground penetrating radar (GPR) data collected from the glacier margins and forelands of Falljökull and of Kvíárjökull, south-east Iceland, between 2012 and 2014. The data were collected using a Sensors and Software PulseEKKO Pro GPR system. For each glacier the data are stored in folders that indicate the month and year in which the surveys were conducted. Each GPR profile has a Sensors and Software GPR (.DT1) file, and associated header (.HD) and GPS (.GPS) files. The .HD files (which can be opened as text files) give the parameters and equipment used for each profile. GPS files are not available for some of the profiles collected on Falljökull in April 2013 (due to damage that occurred to the GPS linked with the PulseEKKO Pro system). For these profiles start, finish, and mid profile positions were recorded using differential GPS, and locations of these profiles are instead given by GIS shapefiles in the relevant folders. These datasets have been used in the publications listed below. Further information relating to the data collection methodology can be found therein. Phillips, Emrys; Everest, Jez; Evans, David J.A.; Finlayson, Andrew; Ewertowski, Marek; Guild, Ailsa; Jones, Lee. 2017 Concentrated, ‘pulsed’ axial glacier flow: structural glaciological evidence from Kvíárjökull in SE Iceland. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 42 (13). 1901-1922. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4145 Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Everest, Jez; Jones, Lee. 2014 Structural evolution triggers a dynamic reduction in active glacier length during rapid retreat: evidence from Falljökull, SE Iceland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 119 (10). 2194-2208. https://doi.org/10.1002/2014JF003165 Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Jones, Lee. 2013 Fracturing, block-faulting and moulin development associated with progressive collapse and retreat of a polar maritime glacier: Virkisjokul-Falljokull, SE Iceland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 118 (3). 1545-1561. https://doi.org/10.1002/jgrf.20116 Flett, Verity; Maurice, Louise; Finlayson, Andrew; Black, Andrew; MacDonald, Alan; Everest, Jez; Kirkbride, Martin. 2017. Meltwater flow through a rapidly deglaciating glacier and foreland catchment system: Virkisjökull, SE Iceland. Hydrology Research, 48 (6). 1666-1681. https://doi.org/10.2166/nh.2017.205

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    The BGS digital Measured Urban Soil Chemistry data comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The data is derived from the national, high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also for assessing ecological risk. Although point source PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk, they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. The urban soil chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The point source data is based on an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

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    Hydrogeological maps of the UK at various scales. Hydrogeological maps of the UK provide information on major aquifers, including geological and lithological information, surface drainage systems and water quality issues. The 23 maps show information on surface water features, the three dimensional geometry of aquifers, groundwater levels, abstractions and quality including saline intrusion in varying amounts of detail. They range in scale from 1:625 000, for the national map of the hydrogeology of England and Wales, down to 1:25 000 for some of the smaller regional maps.

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    This national dataset brings together sixteen national datasets to create a GIS product that provides the information necessary to determine the extent to which the ground is suitable for infiltration sustainable drainage systems (SuDS). It includes derivations of the following datasets: soluble rocks, landslide hazards, groundwater flooding susceptibility, made ground, shallow mining hazards, geological indicators of flooding, depth to water table, superficial thickness, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays, running sands, predominant flow mechanism, permeability indices and the Environment Agencys source protection zone dataset. All datasets have been reclassified and reattributed (with text descriptions and a score field indicating the suitability of the ground for infiltration) and feature in the end product both as single entities, but also in derived 'screening' maps that combine numerous datasets.

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    This dataset of paper records holds details of analysis of all the sample batches (from both internal and external customers) analysed by the Analytical Geochemistry Laboratory of the BGS since June 1996. It was installed to underpin the UKAS (United Kingdom Accreditation Service) accreditation of the geochemistry laboratories at Keyworth, which was awarded in August 1999. There is a file for each batch of samples submitted for analysis. The file documents the progress of the samples through the laboratories, including sample registration, sample processing, raw data from analytical instruments and the data reported to the client. The records are archived to provide supporting evidence for any query regarding geochemical data provided by the laboratories.

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    The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The Insurance Data give an index level assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to create financial insurance loss. The methodology is based on the 6 GeoSure individual hazard assessments. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

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    Two geochemical surveys were undertaken in the Solomon Islands between 1976 and 1983 as part of a combined geological mapping and mineral exploration project. The survey of Choiseul and the Shortland Islands was carried out between 1976 and 1979 by the Institute of Geological Sciences (now the British Geological Survey) with support from staff of the Geology Division of the Ministry of Land, Energy and Natural Resources, Solomon Islands. The project produced 12 geological maps at 1:50,000 scale as well as a series of unpublished reports. The survey of the New Georgia Group of islands was undertaken between 1979 and 1983. The project produced 7 geological maps at a scale of 1:100,000 and a regional map of the entire island group at a scale of 1:250,000. A series of multielement geochemical anomaly maps were produced at a scale of 1:100,000 to accompany each of the published geological maps. Master copies of these are held at the Geological Survey in Honiara. Full descriptions of the methods used are described in the margins of the anomaly maps. A total of 8848 stream sediment samples were collected from Choiseul and 7441 from the New Georgia Group, resulting in an average sampling density for the two areas of 2.68 samples per km2 and 1.47 samples per km2 respectively. Sampling in the Shortland Islands was confined to the larger islands, 187 were collected from the Fauro Island group, 148 from Alu and 69 from Mono. The samples were dry sieved and the fraction passing -80 mesh B.S. (177 microns) was analysed. A hot concentrated nitric acid digestion was used prior to analysis by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry (AAS) for Co, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Mn. Samples from the vicinity of the Siruka Ultramafic Complex were determined for Cr by AAS after digestion by a bisulphate fusion technique. Raw data can be obtained from the Geology Division, Ministry of Mines and Energy, PO Box G37, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

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    The World Magnetic Model (WMM), produced jointly with the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center, is the standard model in UK Ministry of Defence and US Department of Defense navigation and attitude reference systems and is also used widely in civilian navigation systems. The model is also used on marine and aviation charts and is revised every five years.