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British Geological Survey

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    Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of mass movement e.g. landslip. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

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    The Estimated Ambient Background Soil Chemistry England and Wales dataset indicates the estimated geometric mean topsoil Arsenic(As), Cadmium (Cd), Cr (Chromium), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) concentrations (mg kg-1). The soil chemistry data is based on GBASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) soil geochemical data where these are available. Elsewhere the stream sediment data are converted to surface soil equivalent potentially harmful element (PHE) concentrations. This dataset covers England and Wales but data is available for the whole of Great Britain, with the exception of the London area where an inadequate number of geochemical samples are available at the moment.

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    Two geochemical surveys were undertaken in the Solomon Islands between 1976 and 1983 as part of a combined geological mapping and mineral exploration project. The survey of Choiseul and the Shortland Islands was carried out between 1976 and 1979 by the Institute of Geological Sciences (now the British Geological Survey) with support from staff of the Geology Division of the Ministry of Land, Energy and Natural Resources, Solomon Islands. The project produced 12 geological maps at 1:50,000 scale as well as a series of unpublished reports. The survey of the New Georgia Group of islands was undertaken between 1979 and 1983. The project produced 7 geological maps at a scale of 1:100,000 and a regional map of the entire island group at a scale of 1:250,000. A series of multielement geochemical anomaly maps were produced at a scale of 1:100,000 to accompany each of the published geological maps. Master copies of these are held at the Geological Survey in Honiara. Full descriptions of the methods used are described in the margins of the anomaly maps. A total of 8848 stream sediment samples were collected from Choiseul and 7441 from the New Georgia Group, resulting in an average sampling density for the two areas of 2.68 samples per km2 and 1.47 samples per km2 respectively. Sampling in the Shortland Islands was confined to the larger islands, 187 were collected from the Fauro Island group, 148 from Alu and 69 from Mono. The samples were dry sieved and the fraction passing -80 mesh B.S. (177 microns) was analysed. A hot concentrated nitric acid digestion was used prior to analysis by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry (AAS) for Co, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Ag, and Mn. Samples from the vicinity of the Siruka Ultramafic Complex were determined for Cr by AAS after digestion by a bisulphate fusion technique. Raw data can be obtained from the Geology Division, Ministry of Mines and Energy, PO Box G37, Honiara, Solomon Islands.

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    This is a simple Oracle table holding sample numbers, locations (UK National Grid) and illite crystallinity values measured for pelitic (mudrock) samples from Lower Palaeozoic terranes in the UK. Though intended for use by a BGS collaborative project with Birkbeck College, London, data may be made available to others on request.

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    These are OS 1:25000 paper maps (approximately 1400) upon which the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (currently Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG)) recorded hand drawn boundaries for permitted, withdrawn and refused mineral planning permissions and worked ground for every local authority area in England. Accompanying the maps is an associated card index (see metadata for MHLG Cards). Priority was placed on areas that were given rise to then current casework issues thus, at the time when the maintenance of the maps ended some authority information had been updated recently but other areas had not been visited for many years. Therefore, the variable completeness of the data should be kept in mind when the material is being used. Both the maps and the card index have been used to create the digital mineral planning permissions polygons (see metadata for MHLG Planning Permission Polygons). Polygons for worked ground have not been captured.

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    Between 2001 and 2003 BGS received approximately 1400 1:25 000 paper maps and associated card index from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (now Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG)). The maps, originally compiled by the Minerals Division of the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (CLGs historic predecessor), contain hand drawn boundaries for permitted, withdrawn and refused mineral planning permissions, and worked ground. They also contain hand drawn boundaries for land use at each site. These 'MHLG' maps show information collated from the 1940s (retrospectively to 1930) to the mid 1980s. The index cards provide supplementary information regarding name, operator, dates and relevant local authority. Data depicted on the maps are for England only and include; [a] all planning appeals, departures and called in cases whether permitted or refused; [b] all planning permission and refusal data for various local authority areas which were obtained by Departmental officials through visits to authorities in a staged programme spread over many years. Priority was placed on areas that were giving rise to then current casework issues thus at the time when the maintenance of the maps ended (mid 1985), some authority information had been updated recently but other areas had not been visited for many years. [c] land use present at each site. Categories include: derelict areas, restored quarries (filled and unfilled), tip heaps and spoil heaps, and wet areas. The variable completeness of the data sets should be kept in mind when this material is being used. Land use polygons have been digitised from the MHLG maps and attribute information has been provided from the map legend and the appropriate card in the card index. The principal aim of the data is to show land use present in areas of land that have been affected by the extraction of minerals.

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    This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry dataset. The BGS digital point source urban soil chemistry data (GB_PointSourceUrbanSoilPHE_v1) comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The data is derived from the national, high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also for assessing ecological risk. Although point source PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk, they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. The urban soil chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The point source data is based on an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

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    The IGRF is a global model of the geomagnetic field. It allows spot values of the geomagnetic field vector to be calculated anywhere from the Earth's core out into space. The IGRF is generally revised every five years by a group of modellers associated with the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA).

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    The data comprises a GIS layer representing the permeability of bedrock for Great Britain The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, 1:250,000 data are. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

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    The GeoSure datasets and related reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement due to six types of natural geological hazard, in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMapGB-50 (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.