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    The Britrocks database provides an index to the BGS mineralogical & petrological collection. The computer database covers samples in the UK onshore mapping collection together with world wide reference minerals and the Museum Reserve collection. Currently circa 200k out of circa 300k samples are recorded in the computer database. A collection audit is ongoing, so availability of any particular sample is not guaranteed. The first England and Wales collection sample is from circa 1877, Threshthwaite Comb, Cumbria (collected by the Reverend Clifton Ward). The addition of new samples, transfer of records from registers and updates of existing records is ongoing on a regular basis. Internet access to the database is provided on the BGS web site.

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    The K-index scale summarises geomagnetic activity at an observatory by assigning a code, an integer in the range 0 to 9 (0 being the least active field and 9 the most active field) to each 3-hour Universal Time (UT) interval. K-Indices are available for Lerwick, Eskdalemuir, Greenwich, Abinger and Hartland Magnetic Observatories. From 1954-90 the values are hand scaled, from 1991 to the present day they are automatically scaled. The data not only aids scientific research into rates of change of the magnetic field and increases the accuracy of the BGS Global Geomagnetic Model, but also provides data to exploration geophysicists engaged in current and future oil exploration.

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    Miscellaneous geological records for Scotland and Northern England of current or semi-current interest filed in order of accession. Some 65 accessions held which will be subject to review for permanent retention/destruction. Dataset created c.1970 and Indexed on Land Survey Record Index Database.

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    Index to manuscript geological maps produced by the Survey geologists or other recognised geologists on County Series (1:10560) and National Grid (1:10560 & 1:10000) Ordnance Survey base maps. The index was set up in 1991. Current holdings for Great Britain are over 35,000. There are entries for all registered maps but the level of detail depends on nature of original Survey, ie not all fields are complete for all entries.

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    Sometimes known as the "One-Inch Collection", this is an archival collection of rock samples collected by BGS field staff during surveys within England and Wales, arranged by 1-inch (or 50 K) scale BGS geological map sheet area. It was intended as a representative suite of the lithologies present in each sheet, although this was only partially achieved. Documentation is via archive of rock sample collection sheets (see COLLECTIONSHEETS) but is poorly coordinated at present.

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter is devoted to the transportation and injection infrastructure requirements of the Kingsnorth Carbon Capture and Storage development. This encompasses a 36 inch (outside diameter) pipeline which runs onshore for approx 10 km and offshore in the Southern North Sea for 260 km, a platform in the vicinity of the Hewett field location, and appropriate facilities both for the conditioning of CO2 before pipeline entry and the processing of the CO2 stream prior to injection into the sequestration site. The chapter highlights in particular the following areas:- Critical assumptions; Platform Concept Selection; Transport Solution Selection; Pipeline Key Issues; Pipeline Pre-Commissioning; Temperature; Emergency Shutdown; Personnel Safety; Venting; Flow Assurance Modelling. Throughout the execution of the work described in this chapter significant opportunity was taken to ensure that the interfaces from capture (and compression) to pipeline/platform and to wells/storage were managed closely. This was achieved by cross system interface management meetings organized to consider interface issues and to compare issues raised in separate HAZIDs. The purpose of conceptual design has been to identify the problems to be addressed comprehensively by the next stage of FEED and this suite of reports provides valuable insights to the challenges faced. All aspects of establishing an agreed philosophy for design and operation of a storage and transport system for CCS begin with understanding what the initial CO2 flow conditions will be at the interface between the well perforations and the reservoir (i.e. at the sandstone face at the bottom of the well). Further supporting documents for chapter 6 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded.

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This chapter contains the output from many of the Project Management processes which control and report the progress of the FEED. The following commentary gives the reader a brief guide to the project management process or approach which has been used. FEED Programme: In order to scope out, control and report the FEED activity, a Work Breakdown Structure was developed. This structure had the following hierarchy - Level 1 - Chain Element; Level 2 - Phase; Level 3 - Discipline; Level 4 - Work Package (including Cost Time Resource definition); The programme is in the form of a fully resource loaded, logically linked network diagram. Risk Management: Throughout this FEED the management of risk was a key activity. This has helped inform and better understand the important risks faced by the project. This 'first of a kind' project saw a large number of new risks being identified, assessed, controlled and monitored during FEED. Project Cost Estimates: An estimating philosophy was established in FEED to set the standards for the estimates produced from across the project participants, including: To ensure a consistent approach in the collection, calculation and presentation of costs across all FEED Participants; To ensure that all likely project costs are identified and captured along with all associated details. A standard template was established for each participant to complete with the details of their section (i.e. Chain Element) of the cost estimate. The cost estimate was broadly consistent with Class 3/4 estimate as defined by AACE. Further supporting documents for chapter 10 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/abstract/abstract.aspx

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter contains the output from many of the Project Management processes which control and report the progress of the FEED. The following commentary gives the reader a brief guide to the project management process or approach which has been used. FEED Programme: In order to scope out, control and report the FEED activity, a Work Breakdown Structure was developed. This structure had the following hierarchy - Level 1 - Chain Element; Level 2 - Phase; Level 3 - Discipline; Level 4 - Work Package (including Cost Time Resource definition); The programme is in the form of a fully resource loaded, logically linked network diagram. Risk Management: Throughout this FEED the management of risk was a key activity. This has helped inform and better understand the important risks faced by the project. This 'first of a kind' project saw a large number of new risks being identified, assessed, controlled and monitored during FEED. Project Cost Estimates: An estimating philosophy was established in FEED to set the standards for the estimates produced from across the project participants, including: To ensure a consistent approach in the collection, calculation and presentation of costs across all FEED Participants; To ensure that all likely project costs are identified and captured along with all associated details. A standard template was established for each participant to complete with the details of their section (i.e. Chain Element) of the cost estimate. The cost estimate was broadly consistent with Class 3/4 estimate as defined by AACE. Further supporting documents for chapter 10 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/project_manage/project_manage.aspx

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    During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter presents the Environment and Consents Reports produced during the current FEED stage. One of the key objectives of the FEED study was to develop information across the project chain, from CO2 generation to storage in sufficient detail to enable production of applications for environmental consents. A Consents Philosophy was generated upon commencement of the FEED to develop a programme of work to achieve this objective, and identified the following groups of consents: Power and capture plant: 1989 Electricity Act - Section 36; Onshore pipeline: 1990 Town and Country Planning Act; Offshore Pipeline; Offshore Platform; Storage Consents. Some keys aspects of the FEED Consents study are: There were significant uncertainties at the outset of the project regarding the types of consent required. This was a consequence of the planning consent for Kingsnorth Units 5 and 6 having already been submitted in 2006, new government policy and draft regulatory guidance, and ongoing government consultations on regulatory issues; Many of these issues were resolved, enabling development of consent applications for the integrated power and capture plant and onshore and offshore CO2 pipeline. However in some cases, particularly for the offshore platform and storage, uncertainty remained throughout the project. In these instances the deliverable was an interpretation of the regulatory requirements that will need to be reviewed and taken into account to obtain consents during subsequent stages of the project. Further supporting documents for chapter 9 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/environment_/environment_.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report illustrates how the End-to-End CCS chain must be considered as a system as well as separate elements. It builds upon the description of the individual elements contained in Section 3, and captures the development of the End-to-End CCS chain design carried out during FEED. Specifically, this section focuses on the following aspects: Commissioning the system in preparation for operations, as well as decommissioning at the end of the capture and storage period; Operations and maintenance activities; Control; Metering and monitoring; Venting; This section also provides some selected information on the individual CCS chain elements and a summary of the RAM (reliability, availability and maintainability) analysis undertaken during FEED of which one of the key outputs was the anticipated CO2 injection profile for the project. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (End to end CCS chain operation.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/ccs_chain/ccs_chain.aspx