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Carbon capture and storage

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    UKCCSRC Call 2 Project C2-214 . The dataset consists of six excel spreadsheets containing data from six dynamic operating scenarios for post-combustion CO2 capture on coal, implemented at the UKCCSRC’s PACT amine pilot facility. Critical plant parameters including flowrates, temperatures, pressure, solvent composition and CO2 capture rate are recorded. Additional steady-state baseload data and information regarding plant dimensions are provided in a separate word document. The dataset was generated as part of a pilot-scale test campaign which aimed to investigate the effect of differences in plant construction on response to dynamic operations, and to provide a proof-of-concept for the control of plant parameters using continuous, online solvent measurements. They may be of use to those interested in the dynamic modelling of post-combustion CO2 capture, for the purpose of model validation. A collaborative research paper with researchers from Imperial College London is planned.

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    Technical briefing report, August 2013. This briefing summarises the most recent published report addressing the scope for CCS in European industry (ZEP, 2013), adds further information from public sources and gives some new analysis of the implications. Available for download at http://hdl.handle.net/1842/16474.

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    SCCS is the largest Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research group in the UK. Our internationally renowned researchers provide connected strength across the full CCS chain. With our unique position SCCS is able to act as the conduit between academia, industry and government. We are able to provide a single point of coordination for all aspects of CCS research ranging from capture engineering and geoscience, to social perceptions and environmental impact, through to law and petroleum economics. SCCS has access to cutting-edge experimental and analytical facilities, expertise in field studies, modelling and simulation, key academic and research personnel to accelerate the development of CO2 transportation, capture and subsurface storage. We undertake strategic fundamental research and are also available for consultancy. In addition, we perform a key role in providing impartial advice to industry, the public sector, government agencies, and policy makers. Founded in 2005, SCCS is a partnership of the British Geological Survey, Heriot-Watt University, the University of Aberdeen, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Strathclyde working together with universities across Scotland. SCCS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

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    The data consists of an extended abstract submitted to 'The Fourth International Conference on Fault and Top Seals', Almeria, Spain, 20-24th September 2015. The abstract describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The CO2-rich St. Johns Dome reservoir in Arizona provides a useful analogue for leaking CO2 storage sites, and the abstract describes an analysis of the fault-seal behaviour at the site. http://earthdoc.eage.org/publication/publicationdetails/?publication=82673.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Novel Materials and Reforming Processing Route for the Production of Ready-Separated CO2/N2/H2 from Natural Gas Feedstocks, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-181.

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    This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Investigating the radiative heat flux in small and large scale oxy-coal furnaces for CFD model development and system scale up, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-193.

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    The risks associated with the transport and injection of carbon dioxide are reasonably well understood and already borne in the USA. There is a remote possibility that CO2 disposed of underground could leak from a storage reservoir, either through an unidentified migration pathway or as the result of a well failure. The kind of threat that this might represent may be judged by comparison with naturally occurring volcanic CO2 emissions. Diffuse CO2 emissions through the soil or via carbonated springs in volcanic areas do not appear to represent a threat as long as the CO2 is able to disperse into the atmosphere. However, when CO2 is able to build up in enclosed spaces it poses a definite threat. Large CO2 clouds associated with sudden emissions from volcanic vents or craters also pose a lethal threat. However, there appears to be little analogy between such events and any possible leak from a storage reservoir via a natural unidentified migration pathway. Modelling of the development, migration and subsequent dispersal of any CO2 cloud which might arise from a well failure is recommended. doi:10.1016/S0196-8904(96)00276-2. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196890496002762.

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    This is THE first CO2 storage publication produced in the UK. The Association of the Coal Producers of the European Community are agreed that immediate action is required to reduce the build up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere (Harrison, 1990). This is considered necessary even though the effect of these gases on global climate and the human race, are very uncertain mainly because the factors and processes affecting climatic change are poorly understood. http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/511485/

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    Many of the research results from the SACS and CO2STORE projects are published in the scientific literature but in a somewhat fragmented form. This report consolidates some of the key findings into a manual of observations and recommendations relevant to underground saline aquifer storage, aiming to provide technically robust guidelines for effective and safe storage of CO2 in a range of geological settings. This will set the scene for companies, regulatory authorities, nongovernmental organisations, and ultimately, the interested general public, in evaluating possible new CO2 storage projects in Europe and elsewhere. The report can be downloaded from http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/2959/.

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    The data consists of a poster presented at 'The Fourth International Conference on Fault and Top Seals', Almeria, Spain, 20-24th September 2015. The poster describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The CO2-rich St. Johns Dome reservoir in Arizona provides a useful analogue for leaking CO2 storage sites, and the abstract describes an analysis of the fault-seal behaviour at the site as well as at the UK Fizzy and Oak CO2-rich gas Fields