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    Information for this layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) is taken from the BGS National Landslide Database (NLD), which holds over 15000 records of landslides and is the definitive source of landslide information for Great Britain (excludes Northern Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands). Each landslide within the National Landslide Database is identified by a National Landslide Database ID number and a point location, as shown on this map. The National Landslide Database ID number represents an individual survey of a landslide, rather than just the landslide itself. This is because there could be several phases of movement within or extensions to the same landslide, particularly if it is a large and complex one. Subsequent surveys of the same landslide may be recorded in the database with the same National Landslide Database ID number but with a new Survey Number. Other information given for each record include; Landslide name, grid reference and whether the landslide record has been validated by the BGS Landslides Team. The point symbols at the designated location do not reflect the size and shape of the corresponding landslide, but just denote the recorded presence of a landslide within a range of accuracy.

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    The original version of this dataset contained lithologies interpreted as representing a mineral resource for mineral extraction. Collated on a County by County basis as part of the former Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM) Mineral Resource Information in support of National Regional and Local Planning between 1994 and 2006. A primary objective is to produce baseline data in a consistent format that can be updated, revised and customised to suit planning needs, including Mineral Local Plans and Regional Planning Guidance, as well as those of industry. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest. The data should not be used to determine individual planning applications or in taking decisions on the acquisition or use of a particular piece of land, although they may give useful background information which sets a specific proposal in context. During 2011-2012 revisions were made to areas of the resource linework. These changes were made as a result of new research and release of a new version of DiGMap (v5). This work was on an ad hoc basis but affects all resource layers. The paper maps were not re-released with this data update.

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    Derived from data collated from the 2005 Aggregate Minerals Survey, carried out by BGS for the Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG) which provide an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of regional and national sales, inter-regional flows, transportation, consumption and permitted reserves of primary aggregates for England and Wales. The information is used to monitor and develop policies for the supply of aggregates. This data set depicts the flow of crushed rock aggregate between the regions of England and Wales. The data originator also has similar data for sand and gravel and also the same data derived from the 1997 and 2001 Aggregate Minerals Surveys.