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    This data set contains land cover/land use data for the year 1990 and 2015 obtained through processing of Landsat images of US Geological Survey. These data sets were obtained through a supervised classification carried out with Landsat 8 image for 2015; Landsat 4 and 5 were used for land use classification of 1990. Gro for GooD: Groundwater Risk Management for Growth and Development

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    The data set contains Soil Data used in the Gro for GooD Project in Kwale, Kenya based on KENSOTER database and soil survey in study area. The KENSOTER dataset, specific for Kenya, was compiled by the Kenya Soil Survey (KSS) and ISRIC and released in 2006 where ISRIC plays a lead role in methodology development and programme implementation (http://www.isric.org/projects/soil-and-terrain-soter-database-programme). The dataset includes over 600 soil components, including synthetic profiles, which have been derived from soil survey reports and expert knowledge. The second version of the dataset which has been made available includes additional soil profile database and is also used for the assessment of soil carbon stocks. The gaps in the measured soil profile data have been filled using a step-wise procedure which includes three main stages: (1) collate additional measured soil analytical data where available; (2) fill gaps using expert knowledge and common sense; (3) fill the remaining gaps using a scheme of taxotransfer rules. Parameter estimates are presented by soil unit for fixed depth intervals of 0.2 m to 1 m depth for: organic carbon, total nitrogen, pH(H2O), CECsoil, CECclay, base saturation, effective CEC, aluminium saturation, CaCO3 content, gypsum content, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), electrical conductivity of saturated paste (ECe), bulk density, content of sand, silt and clay, content of coarse fragments, and available water capacity. The data have recently been used for the Green Water Credit (GWC) programme in the Upper Tana River Valley. This dataset was prepared for the Gro for GooD project by Mike Thomas, Rural Focus Ltd., Kenya; John Gathenya, JKUAT, Kenya. Gro for GooD: Groundwater Risk Management for Growth and Development

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    Direct geological observations made during field work, tied to positional information collected by hand-held GPS.

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    The file contain groundwater level/depth (WL), Groundwater and Surface Water Quality data (EC (micro-siemens per centimetre or µS/cm), Temperature (°C) and pH) for 49 points under fortnightly monitoring relevant to Gro for GooD research project in Kwale County, Kenya. Blank - Data not available. Gro for GooD: Groundwater Risk Management for Growth and Development

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    Friction coefficient and frictional stability (rate & state parameter) data for triaxially compressed direct shear experiments on kaolinite-rich china clay and Mg-montmorillonite fault gouges (<2micron grain size). A total of 19 raw experimental datasets are presented as detailed in the index files: 13 on kaolinite-rich china clay, and 6 on cation-exchanged Mg-Montmorillonite. The raw data files, logged at either 1 or 2Hz, comprise confining pressures, upstream and downstream fluid pressures, force experienced by the direct shear assembly during triaxial compression, and absolute volumes of the confining pressure and fluid pressure reservoirs. Data is provided as measured by gauges in the pressure vessel in Volts, and also as calculated in MPa, kN and mm3. Also presented are the outputs of MATLAB models run to simulate the rate and state parameters k, a, b, dc and f0 for each experiment, with error data presented as 2sigma and standard error values. Parameters were determined using a non-linear least-squares fitting routine with the machine stiffness treated as a fitting parameter (c.f. Noda and Shimamoto, 2009). Data were fit by a single set of state variables (a, b, dc) with a linear detrend. Also presented are the outputs of Specific Thermogravimetric Analyses on kaolinite-rich china clay and Mg-montmorillonite.

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    The thermal state of marine sediments controls a range of potential dehydration reactions as sediments are subducted. In thick sediment sections it is possible that reactions that would normally occur within a subduction zone start offshore of the deformation front. This scenario may be occurring at the Sumatra subduction zone (e.g. Geersen et al., 2013; Huepers et al., 2017). We have investigated this possibility by modelling the thermal and depth history of sediments offshore Sumatra. We have used a range of different assumptions about how the sediments decompact with depth, as well as testing the dependence on the seismic velocities used for depth conversion of the horizons.

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    In January 1993, as part of the Joule II Non-nuclear Energy Research Programme, the European Commission initiated a two year study of the potential for the disposal of industrial quantifies of carbon dioxide underground, with a view to reducing emissions to the atmosphere. The participants in the study were the British Geological Survey (UK), TNO Institute of Applied Geoscience (The Netherlands), BRGM (France), CRE Group Ltd (UK), IKU Petroleum Research (Norway), RWE AG (Germany), University of Sunderland Renewable Energy Centre (UK) and Statoil (Norway). The objective of the study was to examine whether carbon dioxide emissions from large point sources such as power stations, could be disposed of safely, economically and with no adverse effects on man and the environment. doi:10.1016/0196-8904(95)00308-8. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0196890495003088

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report contains a high-level monthly summary of the total costs incurred performing the Consortium's FEED study. This information is provided with the aim of enabling potential developers of CCS projects to estimate up front FEED costs. A detailed cost breakdown is also provided for each of the key parties within the Consortium in the form of Cost, Time and Resource (CTR) information in PDFs below, under the following references: UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - SP - 001 ScottishPower CTR Summary; UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - ACC - 001 Aker Clean Carbon CTR Summary; UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - NG - 001 National Grid CTR Summary; UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - Shell - 001 Shell CTR Summary; The detailed CTR information provides a breakdown of the actual labour effort used for the totality of the FEED scope of work, presented by month and by CTR activity, the type of expertise used, the number of hours worked and the associated costs. The split between internal and external costs is shown, together with the original budget estimates developed for each CTR prior to commencing FEED. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (FEED cost.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/feed_cost/feed_cost.aspx

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    In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides details of the regulatory work carried out during FEED to achieve the legal requirements of constructing and operating an End-to-End CCS system within European, UK and Scottish legislative frameworks, including implications for consenting of the power plant from which CO2 is to be captured. During the development of the Outline Solution for the UKCCS Demonstration Competition, the Consortium developed a comprehensive Consents Register that tracks month by month progress and captures all relevant Consents, permits and licenses required by the End-to-End CCS chain. A summary of the Consortium progress as of the end of Q1 2011 is provided. Written against a backdrop of significant regulatory change and uncertainty, this report also outlines the process undertaken in identifying consenting risk and provides commentary on the key risks identified, as contained within the project Risk Register. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Consents and permitting.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/consents/consents.aspx

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    The CASSEM project developed new methodologies, workflows and insights essential for the successful identification and evaluation of safe and effective CO2 storage sites in offshore saline aquifers. The project selected on-shore and/or near-shore sites from which useful analogue data and information was obtained in order to characterise important aquifer and cap rock systems. Such onshore data acquisition enables key information to be gathered (through outcrop and/or borehole sampling) at much lower cost than could be achieved for long-term offshore storage options.